Grecian


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Gre·cian

 (grē′shən)
adj.
Of or relating to Greece, especially ancient Greece.
n.
A native or inhabitant of ancient Greece.

[From Latin Graecia, Greece, from Graecus, Greek; see Greek.]

Grecian

(ˈɡriːʃən)
adj
(Art Terms) (esp of beauty or architecture) conforming to Greek ideals, esp in being classically simple
n
(Education) a scholar of or expert in the Greek language or literature
adj, n
1. (Languages) another word for Greek
2. (Peoples) another word for Greek

Gre•cian

(ˈgri ʃən)

adj.
1. Greek.
n.
2. a Greek.
[1540–50; < Latin Graeci(a) Greece + -an1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Grecian - a native or resident of Greece
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Adj.1.Grecian - of or relating to or characteristic of Greece or the Greeks or the Greek language; "Greek mythology"; "a Grecian robe"
Translations

Grecian

[ˈgriːʃən] ADJgriego

Grecian

[ˈgriːʃən] adjgrec(grecque)

Grecian

adjgriechisch

Grecian

[griːʃn] adjgreco/a
References in classic literature ?
Grecian and will not be defined in this standard English dictionary.
After tarrying here awhile, the Bay of Salamis will be crossed, and a day given to Corinth, whence the voyage will be continued to Constantinople, passing on the way through the Grecian Archipelago, the Dardanelles, the Sea of Marmora, and the mouth of the Golden Horn, and arriving in about forty-eight hours from Athens.
Marianne entered the house with a heart swelling with emotion from the consciousness of being only eighty miles from Barton, and not thirty from Combe Magna; and before she had been five minutes within its walls, while the others were busily helping Charlotte to show her child to the housekeeper, she quitted it again, stealing away through the winding shrubberies, now just beginning to be in beauty, to gain a distant eminence; where, from its Grecian temple, her eye, wandering over a wide tract of country to the south-east, could fondly rest on the farthest ridge of hills in the horizon, and fancy that from their summits Combe Magna might be seen.
AMONG the confederacies of antiquity, the most considerable was that of the Grecian republics, associated under the Amphictyonic council.
To him it was a Grecian archipelago that he saw on the map.
There was an air of grandeur in it that struck you with awe, and rivalled the beauties of the best Grecian architecture; and it was as commodious within as venerable without.
I interpret all languages--or nearly all--but as I am a Greek by birth and with a Grecian name, it is with that particular tongue that I am principally associated.
But, by the best contradictory authorities, this Grecian story of Hercules and the whale is considered to be derived from the still more ancient Hebrew story of Jonah and the whale; and vice versa; certainly they are very similar.
No," replied Grandfather; "the different colonies did not compose one nation together; it was merely a confederacy among the governments: It somewhat resembled the league of the Amphictyons, which you remember in Grecian history.
All the Grecian states which now seem best governed, and the legislators who founded those states, appear not to have framed their polity with a view to the best end, or to every virtue, in their laws and education; but eagerly to have attended to what is useful and productive of gain: and nearly of the same opinion with these are some persons who have written lately, who, by praising the Lacedaemonian state, show they approve of the intention of the legislator in making war and victory the end of his government.
Or, if the Nautilus did emerge, nothing was to be seen but the pilot's cage; and sometimes it went to great depths, for, between the Grecian Archipelago and Asia Minor we could not touch the bottom by more than a thousand fathoms.
One of the later school of the Grecians, examineth the matter, and is at a stand, to think what should be in it, that men should love lies; where neither they make for pleasure, as with poets, nor for advantage, as with the merchant; but for the lie's sake.