Greece


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Greece

Greece

 (grēs)
A country of southeast Europe on the southern Balkan Peninsula and including numerous islands in the Mediterranean, Aegean, and Ionian Seas. Settled by Achaeans, Aeolians, Ionians, Minoans, and Dorians by 1000 bc, the region grew as an amalgam of independent city-states, many of which established colonies throughout the Mediterranean by the eighth century bc. Classical Greek culture, centered around Athens, reached a high point in the fifth century bc before being conquered by Philip II of Macedon in 338 bc. The area was later controlled by the Roman and Byzantine Empires before being absorbed into the Ottoman Empire after 1453. In 1829, Greece gained its independence and established a constitutional monarchy. The king was deposed following a military coup in 1967, and a democratic republic was established in 1975. Athens is the capital and the largest city.

Greece

(ɡriːs)
n
(Placename) a republic in SE Europe, occupying the S part of the Balkan Peninsula and many islands in the Ionian and Aegean Seas; site of two of Europe's earliest civilizations (the Minoan and Mycenaean); in the classical era divided into many small independent city-states, the most important being Athens and Sparta; part of the Roman and Byzantine Empires; passed under Turkish rule in the late Middle Ages; became an independent kingdom in 1827; taken over by a military junta (1967–74); the monarchy was abolished in 1973; became a republic in 1975; a member of the European Union. Official language: Greek. Official religion: Eastern (Greek) Orthodox. Currency: euro. Capital: Athens. Pop: 10 772 967 (2013 est). Area: 131 944 sq km (50 944 sq miles). Modern Greek name: Ellás

Greece

(gris)

n.
Ancient Greek, Hellas. Modern Greek, Ellas. a republic in S Europe at the S end of the Balkan Peninsula. 10,707,135; 50,147 sq. mi. (129,880 sq. km).Cap.: Athens.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Greece - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsulaGreece - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Actium - the naval battle in which Antony and Cleopatra were defeated by Octavian's fleet under Agrippa in 31 BC
Chaeronea - a battle in which Philip II of Macedon defeated the Athenians and Thebans (338 BC) and also Sulla defeated Mithridates (86 BC)
Battle of Lepanto, Lepanto - Turkish sea power was destroyed in 1571 by a league of Christian nations organized by the Pope
battle of Leuctra, Leuctra - Thebes defeated Sparta in 371 BC; the battle ended Sparta's military supremacy in Greece
Mantinea, Mantineia - the site of three famous battles among Greek city-states: in 418 BC and 362 BC and 207 BC
battle of Marathon, Marathon - a battle in 490 BC in which the Athenians and their allies defeated the Persians
battle of Navarino, Navarino - a decisive naval battle in the War of Greek Independence (1827); the Turkish and Egyptian fleet was defeated by an allied fleet of British and French and Russian warships
battle of Pharsalus, Pharsalus - Caesar defeated Pompey in 48 BC
battle of Thermopylae, Thermopylae - a famous battle in 480 BC; a Greek army under Leonidas was annihilated by the Persians who were trying to conquer Greece
Balkan Wars - two wars (1912-1913) that were fought over the last of the European territories of the Ottoman Empire and that left the area around Constantinople (now Istanbul) as the only Ottoman territory in Europe
bay wreath, laurel wreath, laurel - (antiquity) a wreath of laurel foliage worn on the head as an emblem of victory
pantheon - (antiquity) a temple to all the gods
Wooden Horse, Trojan Horse - a large hollow wooden figure of a horse (filled with Greek soldiers) left by the Greeks outside Troy during the Trojan War
hybrid, loanblend, loan-blend - a word that is composed of parts from different languages (e.g., `monolingual' has a Greek prefix and a Latin root)
dithyramb - (ancient Greece) a passionate hymn (usually in honor of Dionysus)
Greek, Hellenic, Hellenic language - the Hellenic branch of the Indo-European family of languages
pean, paean - (ancient Greece) a hymn of praise (especially one sung in ancient Greece to invoke or thank a deity)
torch race - (ancient Greece) in which a torch is passed from one runner to the next
souvlaki, souvlakia - made of lamb
17 November, Revolutionary Organization 17 November - a Marxist-Leninist terrorist organization in Greece that is violently opposed to imperialism and capitalism and NATO and the United States; an active terrorist group during the 1980s
ELA, Revolutionary People's Struggle - an extreme leftist terrorist group formed in Greece in 1971 to oppose the military junta that ruled Greece from 1967 to 1974; a revolutionary group opposed to capitalism and imperialism and the United States
Common Market, EC, EEC, European Community, European Economic Community, European Union, EU, Europe - an international organization of European countries formed after World War II to reduce trade barriers and increase cooperation among its members; "he tried to take Britain into the Europen Union"
NATO, North Atlantic Treaty Organization - an international organization created in 1949 by the North Atlantic Treaty for purposes of collective security
Achaea - a region of ancient Greece on the north coast of the Peloponnese
Aegina, Aigina - an island in the Aegean Sea in the Saronic Gulf
Chios, Khios - an island in the Aegean Sea off the west coast of Turkey; belongs to Greece
Kikladhes, Cyclades - a group of over 200 islands in the southern Aegean
Dhodhekanisos, Dodecanese - a group of islands in the southeast Aegean Sea
Doris - a small region of ancient Greece where the Doric dialect was spoken
Lesbos, Lesvos, Mytilene - an island of eastern Greece in the eastern Aegean Sea; in antiquity it was famous for lyric poetry
Rodhos, Rhodes - a Greek island in the southeast Aegean Sea 10 miles off the Turkish coast; the largest of the Dodecanese; it was colonized before 1000 BC by Dorians from Argos; site of the Colossus of Rhodes
Crete, Kriti - the largest Greek island in the Mediterranean; site of the Minoan civilization that reached its peak in 1600 BC
Ithaki, Ithaca - a Greek island to the west of Greece; in Homeric legend Odysseus was its king
Athos, Mount Athos - an autonomous area in northeastern Greece that is the site of several Greek Orthodox monasteries founded in the tenth century
Athens, Athinai, capital of Greece, Greek capital - the capital and largest city of Greece; named after Athena (its patron goddess); "in the 5th century BC ancient Athens was the world's most powerful and civilized city"
2.Greece - ancient Greece; a country of city-states (especially Athens and Sparta) that reached its peak in the fifth century BCE
Balkan country, Balkan nation, Balkan state - any one of the countries on the Balkan Peninsula

Greece

noun
Related words
adjective Hellenic
Translations
Řecko
Grækenland
Kreeka
یونان
Kreikka
Grčka
Görögország
Yunani
ギリシャギリシア
그리스
Graecia
Grecia
Grčija
Grekland
ประเทศกรีซ
nước Hy Lạp

Greece

[griːs] NGrecia f

Greece

[ˈgriːs] nGrèce f
in Greece → en Grèce
to Greece → en Grèce

Greece

nGriechenland nt

Greece

[griːs] nGrecia

Greece

اليونان Řecko Grækenland Griechenland Ελλάδα Grecia Kreikka Grèce Grčka Grecia ギリシャ 그리스 Griekenland Hellas Grecja Grécia Греция Grekland ประเทศกรีซ Yunanistan nước Hy Lạp 希腊
References in classic literature ?
But she did not get it, for though he joined her and answered all her questions freely, she could only learn that he had roved about the Continent and been to Greece.
It was there he caught the fever which held him back on the eve of his departure for Greece and of which he lay ill so long in Naples.
It is an essentially tame and civilized literature, reflecting Greece and Rome.
That, if statues were decreed in Britain, as in ancient Greece and Rome, to public benefactors, this shining citizen would assuredly have had one.
Indeed, had I realised how superbly impressive they were going to be, I think I must have declined the adventure altogether,--for, robed in lustrous ivory-white linen were those figures of undress marble, the wealth of their glorious bodies pressing out into bosoms magnificent as magnolias (nobler lines and curves Greece herself has never known), towering in throats of fluted alabaster, and flowering in coiffures of imperial gold.
Incredible as it may seem to foreigners, it is literally true that in a single building in New York, the Hudson Terminal, there are more telephones than in Odessa or Madrid, more than in the two kingdoms of Greece and Bulgaria combined.
This that comes next," said the barber, "is 'Amadis of Greece,' and, indeed, I believe all those on this side are of the same Amadis lineage.
The same man, stimulated by private pique against the MEGARENSIANS,[2] another nation of Greece, or to avoid a prosecution with which he was threatened as an accomplice of a supposed theft of the statuary Phidias,[3] or to get rid of the accusations prepared to be brought against him for dissipating the funds of the state in the purchase of popularity,[4] or from a combination of all these causes, was the primitive author of that famous and fatal war, distinguished in the Grecian annals by the name of the PELOPONNESIAN war; which, after various vicissitudes, intermissions, and renewals, terminated in the ruin of the Athenian commonwealth.
The history of the states of Greece, and of other countries, abounds with such instances, and it is not improbable that what has so often happened would, under similar circumstances, happen again.
Being subjects either of an absolute or limited monarchy, they have endeavored to heighten the advantages, or palliate the evils of those forms, by placing in comparison the vices and defects of the republican, and by citing as specimens of the latter the turbulent democracies of ancient Greece and modern Italy.
Apart from his colonial career, he had been to Greece in a brigantine with four brass carronades; he had travelled Europe in a chaise and four, drawing bridle at the palace-doors of German princes; queens of song and dance had followed him like sheep and paid his tailor's bills.
In old Greece, in old Rome, he flourish in Germany all over, in France, in India, even in the Chermosese, and in China, so far from us in all ways, there even is he, and the peoples for him at this day.