Greek fire


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Greek fire

n.
An incendiary preparation first used by the Byzantine Greeks to set fire to enemy ships.

Greek fire

n
1. (Military) a Byzantine weapon employed in naval warfare from 670 ad. It consisted of an unknown mixture that, when wetted, exploded and was projected, burning, from tubes
2. (Military) any of several other inflammable mixtures used in warfare up to the 19th century

Greek′ fire′


n.
an incendiary mixture of unknown composition, used in warfare in medieval times by Byzantine Greeks.
[1820–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Greek fire - a mixture used by Byzantine Greeks that was often shot at adversariesGreek fire - a mixture used by Byzantine Greeks that was often shot at adversaries; catches fire when wetted
weapon, weapon system, arm - any instrument or instrumentality used in fighting or hunting; "he was licensed to carry a weapon"
mixture - (chemistry) a substance consisting of two or more substances mixed together (not in fixed proportions and not with chemical bonding)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
said Aramis, "they have, no doubt, Greek fire with which to lighten their own course and ours likewise.
From time to time, as a vulture rears its head out of its nest, the formidable Greek fire darted from its sides, and cast its flame upon the ocean like an incandescent snowfall.
It launched a fresh Greek fire, which fell within twenty paces of the little canoe, and threw a light upon them as white as sunshine.
For an instant his eye was fixed upon the depths of the ocean, illumined by the last flashes of the Greek fire, which ran along the sides of the waves, played on the crests like plumes, and rendered still darker and more terrible the gulfs they covered.
They had pack-mules along, and had brought everything I needed -- tools, pump, lead pipe, Greek fire, sheaves of big rockets, roman candles, colored fire sprays, electric apparatus, and a lot of sundries -- everything necessary for the stateliest kind of a miracle.
We grounded the wire of a pocket electrical battery in that powder, we placed a whole magazine of Greek fire on each corner of the roof -- blue on one corner, green on another, red on another, and purple on the last -- and grounded a wire in each.
But that darkness was licked up by the fierce flames, which at intervals forked forth from the sooty flues, and illuminated every lofty rope in the rigging, as with the famed Greek fire.
Gunpowder was not invented by any one; it was the lineal successor of the Greek fire, which, like itself, was composed of sulfur and saltpeter.
There is yet spirit in him,'' said Malvoisin apart to Mont-Fitchet, ``were it well directed but, like the Greek fire, it burns whatever approaches it.
After deeper research and the discovery of the great Greek Fire sale of the country's assets, the project has expanded into a real life exploration project.
According to Beattie, Plouffe then proceeded to "crawl over Turkish bodies, positioning himself between the Greek fire and Captain Blaquiere.
Meanwhile Greek fire officers and Army volunteers continued to comb the area in a line.