Greek mythology

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Noun1.Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient GreeksGreek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Trojan War - (Greek mythology) a great war fought between Greece and Troy; the Greeks sailed to Troy to recover Helen of Troy, the beautiful wife of Menelaus who had been abducted by Paris; after ten years the Greeks (via the Trojan Horse) achieved final victory and burned Troy to the ground; "the story of the Trojan War is told in Homer's Iliad"
Augean stables - (Greek mythology) the extremely dirty stables that were finally cleaned by Hercules who diverted two rivers through them
Pandora's box - (Greek mythology) a box that Zeus gave to Pandora with instructions that she not open it; she gave in to her curiosity and opened it; all the miseries and evils flew out to afflict mankind
Delphic oracle, Oracle of Apollo, oracle of Delphi, Temple of Apollo - (Greek mythology) the oracle at Delphi where a priestess supposedly delivered messages from Apollo to those who sought advice; the messages were usually obscure or ambiguous
Elysian Fields, Elysium - (Greek mythology) the abode of the blessed after death
Charybdis - (Greek mythology) a ship-devouring whirlpool lying on the other side of a narrow strait from Scylla
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
Colchis - (Greek mythology) a region on the Black Sea to the south of the Caucasus that was the site of an ancient country where (according to Greek mythology) Jason sought the Golden Fleece
Acheron, River Acheron - (Greek mythology) a river in Hades across which the souls of the dead were carried by Charon
Cocytus, River Cocytus - (Greek mythology) a river in Hades that was said to be a tributary of the Acheron
Lethe, River Lethe - (Greek mythology) a river in Hades; the souls of the dead had to drink from it, which made them forget all they had done and suffered when they were alive
Liakoura, Mount Parnassus, Parnassus - (Greek mythology) a mountain in central Greece where (according to Greek mythology) the Muses lived; known as the mythological home of music and poetry; "Liakoura is the modern name of Mount Parnassus"
River Styx, Styx - (Greek mythology) a river in Hades across which Charon carried dead souls
Augeas - (Greek mythology) the mythical Greek king who for 30 years did not clean his stables which contained his vast herd of cattle
Alcyone, Halcyon - (Greek mythology) a woman who was turned into a kingfisher
Demogorgon - (Greek mythology) a mysterious and terrifying deity of the underworld
Argus - (Greek mythology) a giant with 100 eyes; was guardian of the heifer Io and was slain by Hermes
Cadmus - (Greek mythology) the brother of Europa and traditional founder of Thebes in Boeotia
Calypso - (Greek mythology) the sea nymph who detained Odysseus for seven years
sea nymph - (Greek mythology) a water nymph who was the daughter of Oceanus or Nereus
Cyclops - (Greek mythology) one of a race of giants having a single eye in the middle of their forehead
Scylla - (Greek mythology) a sea nymph transformed into a sea monster who lived on one side of a narrow strait; drowned and devoured sailors who tried to escape Charybdis (a whirlpool) on the other side of the strait
Stentor - the mythical Greek warrior with an unusually loud voice who died after losing a shouting contest with Hermes
Cerberus, hellhound - (Greek mythology) the three-headed dog guarding the entrance to Hades; son of Typhon
Charon - (Greek mythology) the ferryman who brought the souls of the dead across the river Styx or the river Acheron to Hades
Chimaera, Chimera - (Greek mythology) fire-breathing female monster with a lion's head and a goat's body and a serpent's tail; daughter of Typhon
Chiron - (Greek mythology) the learned centaur who tutored Achilles, Asclepius, Hercules, Jason, and other heroes
Circe - (Greek mythology) a sorceress who detained Odysseus on her island and turned his men into swine
Dardanus - (Greek mythology) founder of Troy
Ganymede - (Greek mythology) a Trojan boy who was so beautiful that Zeus carried him away to serve as cupbearer to the gods
Geryon - (Greek mythology) a mythical monster with three heads that was slain by Hercules
Gorgon - (Greek mythology) any of three winged sister monsters and the mortal Medusa who had live snakes for hair; a glance at Medusa turned the beholder to stone
Grace - (Greek mythology) one of three sisters who were the givers of beauty and charm; a favorite subject for sculptors
Aglaia - (Greek mythology) one of the three Graces
Euphrosyne - (Greek mythology) one of the three Graces
Thalia - (Greek mythology) one of the three Graces
Harpy - (Greek mythology) vicious winged monster; often depicted as a bird with the head of a woman
Hydra - (Greek mythology) monster with nine heads; when struck off each head was replaced by two new ones; "Hydra was slain by Hercules"
Hyperborean - (Greek mythology) one of a people that the ancient Greeks believed lived in a warm and sunny land north of the source of the north wind
Translations
mitologia greca
References in periodicals archive ?
Beware: Since different narratives were told at different times in different cities by different authors, there is no one accepted version of any Greek myth.
In the particular Greek myth I'll be using with students, the stone Rhea wraps is called an omphalos.
I know it comes from a Greek myth, but when did it start being used to mean egotism?
In Greek myth, the 'apple of discord' eventually led to which event?
Complemented by Rocco's elegant paintings, and printed on the thick smooth paper one expects in an art reference, this book is a unique combination: classical Greek myth reference and a very 21st-century retelling of the same.
is a toddler distillation of the Greek myth of the Twelve Labors of Hercules, in sturdy pasteboard book format.
A few classicists, but mostly scholars of English literature and theater expand the usual focus on Greek myth to include dramatic retellings of myths and legends from many cultures and times.
Ivanovski also mentions a series of falsifications that are constantly served to the world public and which portray the misery of building the Greek myth that rests on a pile of lies.
Icarus at the Edge of Time is a futuristic reimagining of the classic Greek myth set in outer space, based on a book by world-renowned physicist Brian Greene.
In lien's Teeth, a cast of 11 fleshes out his vision of flying and birdlike women, sourcing a Breton fairytale and Greek myth.
Of stories containing this image, the best known is the Greek myth of Theseus and Ariadne.
Based on the Greek myth of Pygmalion, this book puts an innovative, modern twist on an ancient tale.