Greenland


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Green·land

 (grēn′lənd, -lănd′)
An island in the northern Atlantic Ocean off northeast Canada. It is the largest island in the world and lies mostly within the Arctic Circle. Settled by the Norse between the 10th and the 15th century and by the Inuit beginning around the 10th century, Greenland became a Danish colony in the 18th century and was granted home rule in 1979. Nuuk (Godthåb) is the capital.

Green·land′ic (-lăn′dĭk) adj.
Word History: How did a glacier-covered island get the name Greenland? In Icelandic sagas written in the 12th century and later, it is told that Eric the Red explored the southeast and southwest coasts of Greenland in ad 983-986. He thought his fellow Icelanders would be more likely to go there if it had an attractive name, and he therefore called it Grænland, Icelandic for "Greenland." This was not exactly a case of false advertising. Greenland was warmer in the 10th century than it is now. There were many islands teeming with birds off its western coast, the sea was excellent for fishing, and the coast of Greenland itself had many fjords where anchorage was good. Moreover, at the head of the fjords there were enormous meadows full of grass, willows, junipers, birch, and wild berries. Icelanders set up colonies in Greenland that thrived for much of the next three hundred years. In the middle of the 14th century, however, the North Atlantic area began to cool significantly. The colonies began to die out, and they finally disappeared at the very beginning of the 15th century. Only the Inuit continued to live on the island as the climate grew progressively colder and the formerly green valleys of Greenland were covered by ice.

Greenland

(ˈɡriːnlənd)
n
(Placename) a large island, lying mostly within the Arctic Circle off the NE coast of North America: first settled by Icelanders in 986; resettled by Danes from 1721 onwards; integral part of Denmark (1953–79); granted internal autonomy 1979; mostly covered by an icecap up to 3300 m (11 000 ft) thick, with ice-free coastal strips and coastal mountains; the population is largely Inuit, with a European minority; fishing, hunting, and mining. Capital: Nuuk (Godthåb). Pop: 57 714 (2013 est). Area: 175 600 sq km (840 000 sq miles). Danish name: Grønland Greenlandic name: Kalaallit Nunaat

Green•land

(ˈgrin lənd, -ˌlænd)

n.
a self-governing island belonging to Denmark located NE of North America: the largest island in the world. 58,203; ab. 840,000 sq. mi. (2,175,600 sq. km); over 700,000 sq. mi. (1,800,000 sq. km) icecapped. Cap.: Godthåb.
Green′land•er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Greenland - the largest island in the worldGreenland - the largest island in the world; lies between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean; a self-governing province of Denmark
Thule - a town in northwestern Greenland; during World War II a United States naval base was built there
Arctic Ocean - ice covered waters surrounding the North Pole; mostly covered with solid ice or with ice floes and icebergs
Atlantic, Atlantic Ocean - the 2nd largest ocean; separates North and South America on the west from Europe and Africa on the east
subcontinent - a large and distinctive landmass (as India or Greenland) that is a distinct part of some continent
Translations
Grónsko
Grønland
Grönlanti
Grenland
グリーンランド
그린란드
Grönland
ประเทศกรีนแลนด์
đảo Greenland

Greenland

[ˈgriːnlənd] NGroenlandia f

Greenland

[ˈgriːnlənd] nGroenland m

Greenland

nGrönland nt

Greenland

[ˈgriːnlənd] nGroenlandia

Greenland

جرينلاند Grónsko Grønland Grönland Γροιλανδία Groenlandia Grönlanti Groenland Grenland Groenlandia グリーンランド 그린란드 Groenland Grønland Grenlandia Groelândia, Gronelândia Гренландия Grönland ประเทศกรีนแลนด์ Grönland đảo Greenland 格陵兰
References in classic literature ?
In like manner, the Greenland whalers sailing out of Hull or London, put in at the Shetland Islands, to receive the full complement of their crew.
What would become of a Greenland whale, say, in those shuddering, icy seas of the north, if unsupplied with his cosy surtout?
Nor could I pass unnoticed the suggestion of the bleak shores of Lapland, Siberia, Spitzbergen, Nova Zembla, Iceland, Greenland, with "the vast sweep of the Arctic Zone, and those forlorn regions of dreary space,--that reservoir of frost and snow, where firm fields of ice, the accumulation of centuries of winters, glazed in Alpine heights above heights, surround the pole, and concentre the multiplied rigours of extreme cold.
Now Greenland drops behind again, And I sail the ocean Blue.
These whales I have known so large, that a man could hardly carry one upon his shoulders; and sometimes, for curiosity, they are brought in hampers to Lorbrulgrud; I saw one of them in a dish at the king's table, which passed for a rarity, but I did not observe he was fond of it; for I think, indeed, the bigness disgusted him, although I have seen one somewhat larger in Greenland.
He tells me that he is nearly a hundred, and that he was a sailor in the Greenland fishing fleet when Waterloo was fought.
It is the Greenland whale you have hunted up to this time, and that would not risk passing through the warm waters of the equator.
She says there's a bad blow-out ahead and wants me to pull over to Greenland.
In addition to the floe and the pack-ice, the gale and the currents were bringing down true bergs, sailing mountains of ice, snapped off from the Greenland side of the water or the north shore of Melville Bay.
I had come to Greenland for the summer, on the advice of my physician, and was slowly being bored to extinction, as I had thoughtlessly neglected to bring sufficient reading-matter.
8] If we suppose the case of the discovery of a skeleton of a Greenland whale in a fossil state, not a single cetaceous animal being known to exist, what naturalist would have ventured conjecture on the possibility of a carcass so gigantic being supported on the minute crustacea and mollusca living in the frozen seas of the extreme North?
They settled Iceland and Greenland and prematurely discovered America; they established themselves as the ruling aristocracy in Russia, and as the imperial body-guard and chief bulwark of the Byzantine empire at Constantinople; and in the eleventh century they conquered southern Italy and Sicily, whence in the first crusade they pressed on with unabated vigor to Asia Minor.