Gregorian chant


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Gregorian chant

n. Roman Catholic Church
An unaccompanied, monophonic liturgical chant.

[After Saint Gregory I.]

Gregorian chant

n
(Music, other) another name for plainsong

Grego′rian chant′


n.
the plainsong formerly used in the ritual of the Roman Catholic Church.
[1745–55; after Pope Gregory I]

Gregorian chant

Unaccompanied church vocal music without definite rhythm.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gregorian chant - a liturgical chant of the Roman Catholic ChurchGregorian chant - a liturgical chant of the Roman Catholic Church
chant - a repetitive song in which as many syllables as necessary are assigned to a single tone
cantus firmus - a melody used as the basis for a polyphonic composition
Translations
frankoroomalainen kirkkolaulugregoriaaninen kirkkolaulu
gregorssöngur

Gregorian chant

References in classic literature ?
Sometimes it modulated into tones which reminded me of the severer harmonies of the old Gregorian chants.
You may have heard of Gregorian chant, but did you know there are many forms of chant, including Ambrosian and Byzantine chant?
But it also produced Gregorian chant, which is without doubt transcendentally beautiful and was almost certainly appreciated by the men of evil of those days.
Among his many publications are Music, A Listener's Introduction (1983) and Gregorian Chant and the Carolingians (1998).
The abbey is renowned for Gregorian chant and the production of world-class cheeses and apple cider.
I really enjoy Gregorian chant and other forms of sacred music,'' said the clergyman.
It's been a very long time since I heard a Gregorian chant, but its memory was still very strong in my mind's ear, if you will.
Augustine's Seminary in Scarborough, Ontario, in 1916 and, after ordination in 1922, studied Gregorian chant in New York with Dom Mocquereau at the Plus X School and later in France at Solesmes Abbey.
Fitzpleasure showcases the band's ability to jump between Gregorian chant, Afropop-tinged dubstep, ethereal electronica and raucous folk.
Led by prelates holding a crucifix and candles, the cardinals chanted the Litany of Saints, the Gregorian chant imploring the intercession of the saints, as they filed into the chapel and took their oath of secrecy.
According to University of Manchester Professor Barry Cooper, the composer wrote a harmony for the Gregorian chant Pange Lingua and modified its tune.
Named after Pope Gregory I, Gregorian chant consists solely of unaccompanied melody, and its long, mellifluous lines have brought peace to listeners throughout the ages.