Gregory of Nazianzus


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Related to Gregory of Nazianzus: Gregory of Nyssa, John Chrysostom, St. Gregory Nazianzen

Gregory of Nazianzus

(ˌnæzɪˈænzəs)
n
(Biography) Saint. ?329–89 ad, Cappadocian theologian: bishop of Caesarea (370–79). Feast days: Jan 2, 25, and 30
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References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are the use and function of illustrated books in Byzantine society, the Alexander Romance, the Vatican Book of Kings, the homilies of Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Christian Topography of Kosmas Indikopleustes.
Each created thing has its own essential reason (logos), Gregory of Nazianzus held, and nothing can exist if it is not grounded in the divine Logos.
454), and points out its allusions to poets such as Homer, Hesiod, Gregory of Nazianzus, Nonnus, and, impressively, Paul the Silentiary, whom George deliberately "corrects" (pp.
Christ in the Life and Teaching of Gregory of Nazianzus.
In their attempt to expose and explain the mystery of faith in a God that is trinitarian and is defined in his very existence as love, the early church Fathers, in particular St Gregory of Nazianzus (2) and St John of Damascus, (3) insisted on the fact that God is not static but dynamic.
On the ninth day, Gregory of Nazianzus, who was the Archbishop of Constantinople during the fourth century, is honoured.
Topics include religious education in classical Greece, learning about the Etruscan religion in ancient Rome, the Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles as precursor of the conjunction of biblical faith and Hellenistic education, religious education in late antique paganism, Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nazianzus on poetry in Christian education, primary and secondary religious education in Byzantium, and religious education and Bernard of Clairvaux.
This she does via the study of church fathers John of Damascus, Gregory of Nyssa, Athanasius, Gregory of Nazianzus, and St.
Almost 300 years went by before Pope Pius V added to these "Western" doctors four counterparts from the East: Saints Athanasius (295-373), Basil the Great (330-379), Gregory of Nazianzus (330-390), and John Chrysostom (345-407).
He carefully assesses how the concept functioned rhetorically in dialogue with pagan writers and with other Christians, particularly heretics, especially in the writings of Athanasius and Gregory of Nazianzus.
The evidence he evinces for this in the very early period seems sound enough, incorporating Pliny the Elder, Plutarch and Gregory of Nazianzus.
Abstract: For Saint Gregory of Nazianzus the Christian fight for purification and holiness is a true place of communion that is inscribed in the dynamics of existence.