Gregory of Tours


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Gregory of Tours

 (to͝or, to͞or), Saint 538-594.
Frankish prelate and historian who produced a valuable history of the sixth-century Franks.

Gregory of Tours

n
(Biography) Saint. ?538–?594 ad, Frankish bishop and historian. His Historia Francorum is the chief source of knowledge of 6th-century Gaul. Feast day: Nov 17

Greg′ory of Tours′


n.
Saint, A.D. 538?–594, Frankish bishop and historian.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gregory of Tours told how Childeric was exiled by the Franks in Soissons for his lewd behaviour and had to hide at Thuringian king Basin's household.
Such intertwining continued in the days of Gregory of Tours (538-594), the subject of chapter 5.
Helmut Reimitz follows with an analysis of the meanings behind de vobis sum and homo ignotus within a context of competing constructs of Frankish identity in the sixth and seventh centuries, specifically those of Gregory of Tours and the compilers of the Fredegar Chronicle.
Gregory of Tours, best known for his misleadingly titled History of the Franks, offers a great deal of insight into the variety of legitimate avenues of spiritual expression to be found during this era.
Martin's shrine and reported by Gregory of Tours, examines the role of physically violent divine action (vomiting, for example) as essential parts of cures.
From Herodotus to Nathalie Zeman Davis, through the byways of Gibbon and Gregory of Tours, Wells puts the historian in the spotlight.
We delight with him in the conversational, confiding tone of Herodotus's account of the wars between the Greeks and Persians, in recurrent patterns of providential intervention in Biblical history, in the newly universal history Polybius saw in the rise of Rome, in the vibrant and violent world of war berserks Gregory of Tours conjures for us, in the thoroughly detailed political account Guicciardini gives of Italy's subjugation to foreign powers, and, of course, in the refreshing elegance and erudition of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
In the 6th century AD, Gregory of Tours, a Frankish bishop and historian, wanted no part of the astrology and astral religion of the ancients.
Bishop Gregory of Tours mentioned one such leprosarium at Cabillonum, the modern Chalon-sur-Sa6ne.
In AD 585 Gregory of Tours was staying in Koblenz with King Childebert.
Gregory of Tours (538-594), an erudite Merovingian bishop, reported that some thieves stole the stained-glass windows from a church to extract the gold that they believed responsible for their marvelous highlights.
Wood deals with Gregory of Tours as a reliable source in relation to Clovis, while Alexander Murray explores examples of the mutual borrowing of Christianity and pre-Christian magic.