Grexit


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Grexit

(ˈɡrɛɡzɪt)
n
(Economics) the potential withdrawal of Greece from the group of countries using the common European currency
[C21: Gr(eek) + exit]
References in periodicals archive ?
An exit from the euro zone, a Grexit, would be the right way," he said, adding that any extension of negotiations with Athens would amount only to delaying a bankruptcy.
William Hill said its latest odds of a Grexit in 2015 stood at 13/8, implying a 38 percent chance.
Local media speculated as to whether the PAOK incident may provoke the expulsion of Greece from international competition, already dubbing the possible move as a"football Grexit," referencing the term used to mean Greece's potential removal or withdrawal from the European Union.
Even when a referendum in 2015 decisively rejected a new austerity program, the Syriza government feared the chaos of Grexit more than it did the pain of austerity.
com/grexit-next-after-brexit-greek-stock-market-leads-europe-losses-after-british-2386360) Grexit " are now concerns in France and Greece, respectively.
The 10-11 favourite jumped into the lead under Aspell three out and steadily pulled away, eventually scoring by seven lengths from Grexit.
1 percent respondents expected that the Grexit risk will most likely resurface in 2016.
Among the key external headwind came from China's economies woes, fears of Grexit or exit of Greece from the European Union and the US Fed interest rate lift-off which started this month.
I completely understand the bitterness of certain circles who perhaps were hoping for the failure of the bank recapitalisation to bring back the scenario of Grexit.
Tourist industry analysts said many tourists stayed away this year because of a threat of Greece's insolvency and talk about a Grexit, or Greece's exit from the eurozone.
Analysts are warning that the political and financial crisis in Greece which held its second election in September this year is not over and they warn that the nightmare of a Grexit might surface anytime again.
Michael Jacobides, Associate Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, London Business School, said Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras realised last month that a potential Grexit had too many far reaching negative impacts in the near future that it was untenable.