grice

(redirected from Gricean)

grice

(ˈɡraɪs)
vb
(Trainspotting) (intr) (of a railway enthusiast) to collect objects or visit places connected with trains and railways
n
(Trainspotting) an object collected or place visited by a railway enthusiast
[C20: origin obscure]
ˈgricer n
ˈgricing n
References in periodicals archive ?
373, 394 (1985) (explaining the rule against surplusage along Gricean lines).
Semantic originalism claims to be able to discern Gricean sentence meaning without addressing intent.
This paper argues that there is a very important, though often neglected, dissimilarity between the two Gricean conceptions of "what is said": the one presented in his William James Lectures and the one sketched in the "Retrospective Epilogue" to his book Studies in the Way of Words.
Thus, the data suggest that the Gricean cooperative principle, when interpreting, involves the establishment of particular cues for negotiating meaning during the presentation.
Mohammad Farghal's ("Euphemism in Arabic: A Gricean Interpretation," Anthropological Linguistics 37 [1995]: 366-78) approach to euphemism as a pragmatic mechanism is indeed sensitive to its sociolinguistic function, but he concentrates on Modern Standard Arabic and Colloquial Jordanian Arabic; in his EALL entry, "Euphemism.
But a quick survey of the literature reveals that the idea in question--that Gricean pragmatics supports a broadly Dworkinian view--is no straw man.
Other issues briefly mentioned in the introduction include consequences for the study of meaning following from logical empiricism, Quine's holism, different accounts of language proposed by Wittgenstein, Austin, Chomsky, and Derrida, Gricean investigations into the border between semantics and pragmatics, Davidson's truth theory and thesis on radical interpretation, and Dummett's views on theories of meaning.
This cooperation is rationality-based and can be specified with the help of some set of (adapted) Gricean maxims.
For nearly four decades Larry Horn has been championing a version of Gricean pragmatic reasoning in the analysis of a wide range of linguistic phenomena.
Given the nature of the alternative interpretations of sentences like Every/all N neg VP, the preference for the 'not all' reading has all the attributes of a Gricean phenomenon (see Section 2.
Austin 1962; Searle 1969, 1975) and Gricean pragmatics (cf.
In Chapter 4, 'Conditional Logic', after some remarks on the view that indicative conditionals are material conditionals and on its Gricean critique (72-5), the probabilistic theory of indicative conditions is discussed (75-81).