grice

(redirected from Gricean)

grice

(ˈɡraɪs)
vb
(Trainspotting) (intr) (of a railway enthusiast) to collect objects or visit places connected with trains and railways
n
(Trainspotting) an object collected or place visited by a railway enthusiast
[C20: origin obscure]
ˈgricer n
ˈgricing n
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
2011) (noting that "[p]hilosophy of language and Gricean theory
In particular, courts recognize many of the same sorts of Gricean implicatures as do interlocutors in ordinary conversation.
Computational Interpretations of the Gricean Maxims in the Generation of Referring Expressions.
Legal historian Saul Cornell has commented that an historical application of Gricean pragmatics would resemble a Geertzian thick description and has remarked upon Geertz's recent contribution to historical methodology.
The headlines are analyzed within discourse pragmatics, Speech Act Theory and Gricean Pragmatics.
Theoretically, then, the Gricean maxims could well hold in the context of CMC--if communicators share a common goal of their exchange.
Gricean pragmatics has often been criticized for being implausible from a psychological point of view.
Moreover, the Gricean speaker's meaning of an utterance is not necessarily identical to the meaning that the audience actually takes from the utterance.
The rules are meant to represent a way of codifying the Gricean conversational principles (Grice, 1975).
In terms of a general pedagogical framework, we adopt a Gricean approach to spoken language production and argue that students should aim to produce language that is informative (the quantity maxim), conveys the truth (the quality maxim), is relevant (the relevance maxim) and is spoken clearly and appropriate in length (the maxim of manner).
Abstract: Gricean pragmatics is one of the mainstreams in philosophy of language and linguistics.
Ekins has many other examples demonstrating the impossibility of semantic autonomy and the necessity in understanding language use to seek out the Gricean speaker's intended meaning, the meaning the speaker intends as the uptake of his audience.