Griselda


Also found in: Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Gri•sel•da

(grɪˈzɛl də)

n.
a woman of extraordinary meekness and patience.
(after a character in Boccaccio's Decameron]
References in periodicals archive ?
The young Griselda marches back into the man's house, robs him and shoots him with his own gun.
She spoke after getting rave reviews for portraying drug billionaire Griselda Blanco in the US TV movie Cocaine Godmother.
Husband Michael Douglas, 73, told her she didn't need to work hard to play real life New York drug queen Griselda Blanco in TV film Cocaine Godmother because she was frightening enough at home.
Michael, 73, told his wife not to overact as she prepared to play real-life criminal kingpin Griselda Blanco, who grew a billiondollar empire from the streets of Queens, New York, to California.
The name was resurrected when Griselda Hill moved to Fife in 1984.
When Griselda Martinez threw in a halfcourt shot at the end of the third quarter, it seemed like it was going to be Round Lake's day.
Get a look at the gritty underworld of the cocaine trade business with Lifetime's latest original movie, "Cocaine Godmother: The Griselda Blanco Story," starring Catherine Zeta-Jones as the title character.
La importancia del parque "Griselda Alvarez" era reconocida por la propia autoridad, de ello daba cuenta el portal de la Secretaria de Turismo de Colima: "El parque regional metropolitano Griselda Alvarez abrio sus puertas al publico en noviembre de 1985 muy cerca del centro historico de la capital colimense.
Ineke van Kessel and Arthur Japin published Zwarte Hollanders: Afrikaanse soldaten in Nederlands-Indie (2005) and Griselda Molemans, who started archival research in 2003, wrote three titles on the subject.
Catherine also enthused about 'The Godmother,' her passion project in which she will star as Griselda Blanco, also known as the Cocaine Godmother-reportedly the deadliest, wealthiest woman to lead a Colombian drug cartel.
This paper traces Zeno's investment in the tre corone, focusing primarily on two of his libretti: La Griselda (1701) and Scipione nelle Spagne (1710).
Indeed they did not, but when they are whizzed, in a secret steam train, into a strange other-world where the wicked Griselda rules with an iron rod, they soon learn what to do to survive and save the day.