Gros Ventre

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Gros Ventre

 (grō′ vänt′)
n. pl. Gros Ventre or Gros Ventres (vänt′)
1.
a. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting the plains of northern Montana and southern Saskatchewan, with a present-day population in north central Montana.
b. The Algonquian language of the Atsina, dialectally related to Arapaho. Also called Atsina.
2. See Hidatsa.

[French, big belly : gros, big + ventre, belly (from an indigenous sign-language gesture designating this people that suggested a big belly).]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Gros Ventre - a member of the Sioux people formerly inhabiting an area along the Missouri river in western North DakotaGros Ventre - a member of the Sioux people formerly inhabiting an area along the Missouri river in western North Dakota
Siouan, Sioux - a member of a group of North American Indian peoples who spoke a Siouan language and who ranged from Lake Michigan to the Rocky Mountains
2.Gros Ventre - a Siouan language spoken by the Hidatsa
Siouan language, Siouan - a family of North American Indian languages spoken by the Sioux
References in classic literature ?
Under the general name of Blackfeet are comprehended several tribes: such as the Surcies, the Peagans, the Blood Indians, and the Gros Ventres of the Prairies: who roam about the southern branches of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers, together with some other tribes further north.
The bands infesting the Wind River Mountains and the country adjacent at the time of which we are treating, were Gros Ventres of the Prairies, which are not to be confounded with Gros Ventres of the Missouri, who keep about the lower part of that river, and are friendly to the white men.
72) Although the Assiniboines and Gros Ventres entered into an alliance in 1853 in order to fight their common enemy, the Blackfeet, and later in 1868 to fight the Lakotas and Dakotas, many Gros Ventre people still identify struggles for primacy with the Assiniboines at Fort Belknap.
The 1855 treaty, known as Lame Bull's Treaty, was negotiated with the Blackfeet Nation as well as their close neighbors and allies at the time, the Gros Ventres.
Loretta Fowler, Shared Symbols, Contested Meanings: Gros Ventres Culture and History, 1778-1984 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1987), 198-203.
First, the cultural and religious life of the Gros Ventres is pervaded
Gros Ventres traditionally were strongly committed to the ritual
Welch, after all, is Gros Ventre and Piegan (Blackfeet) by Indian heritage, and he lived for some time with his grandparents on the Fort Belknap Reservation, where the Gros Ventres are now located.
Schilz's article "The Gros Ventres and the Canadian Fur Trade 1754-1831" in the American Indian Quarterly (Vol.
Flesh Eater's band of Gros Ventres as well as various Blackfeet bands constantly pestered the traders for free brandy.
In my article, "The Gros Ventres in the Canadian Fur Trade," I have endeavored to do that.
Sent by the Hudson's Bay Company to drum up trade, Cocking received a polite but firm "no" from the Gros Ventres, who had no desire to travel to York Factory.