gross profit

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Related to Gross operating profit: EBITDA, Net Operating Profit

gross profit

n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) accounting the difference between total revenue from sales and the total cost of purchases or materials, with an adjustment for stock
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gross profit - (finance) the net sales minus the cost of goods and services sold
corporate finance - the financial activities of corporation
net income, net profit, profit, profits, earnings, lucre, net - the excess of revenues over outlays in a given period of time (including depreciation and other non-cash expenses)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the small-group market, the gross operating profit ratio fell to 15 percent, from 16 percent.
Sharjah-based Investbank reported gross operating profit of AED 608 million and net operating profit before provisions of AED 480.
3 per cent as gross operating profit per available room reached $117.
9 per cent growth in gross operating profit per available room .
Three regression models are run to determine if promotional allowances increase gross revenue, net revenue, and gross operating profit for Atlantic City casinos.
Mondadori's consolidated gross operating profit slumped 39.
Land sale and stable growths in core businesses helped push combined gross operating profit and combined net operating profit in the first three quarters to NT$41.
According to the HOST Study, Gross Operating Profit (GOP) rested at 36.
Meanwhile, the gross operating profit for the quarter ended March 31, 2011 amounted to SR 15.
Although the headline profit figure in its full-year results was better than consensus expectations, drilling down into the figures reveals a shortfall in gross operating profit of pounds 800m.
65bn in the first nine months, while gross operating profit increased by 11 percent to RON1.
Gross operating profit slumped to NOK275m from NOK568m, mainly due to a sharp fall in prices in Europe from the beginning of 2010, higher prices for recovered paper and market pulp, and a stronger Norwegian crown.