Guarnerius


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Related to Guarnerius: Giuseppe Guarneri

Guar·ne·ri·us

 (gwär-nâr′ē-əs, -nîr′-)
n.
A violin made by a member of the Guarneri family.

Guar•ne•ri•us

(gwɑrˈnɛər i əs)

n., pl. -us•es.
a violin made by Guarneri or by a member of his family.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Guarnerius - Italian violin maker and grandson of Andrea Guarneri (1687?-1745)Guarnerius - Italian violin maker and grandson of Andrea Guarneri (1687?-1745)
2.Guarnerius - founder of a family of Italian violin makers (1626?-1698)Guarnerius - founder of a family of Italian violin makers (1626?-1698)
3.Guarnerius - a violin made by a member of the Guarneri family
fiddle, violin - bowed stringed instrument that is the highest member of the violin family; this instrument has four strings and a hollow body and an unfretted fingerboard and is played with a bow
References in periodicals archive ?
This is like a voice a wine, it's like an instrument with what we call a timbre, which is different--a Steinway is not the same, and that's the difference between Laffite and Latour, between a Guarnerius and a Stradivarius.
It contained detailed plans for making violins in the Guarnerius and Stradivarius style.
Further sources for the dealer repeat sales include "Catalog descriptif des instruments de Stradivarius et Guarnerius del Gesu" (Les Amis de la Musique, Spa 1994), the Jacques Francais Business Records at the Smithsonian Institution (these also include the business record of Emil Herrmann), and the papers of Gerald Segelman from the Segelman Trust (2009) (in Mr.
These days Charlie plays a priceless 1735 Guarnerius del Jesu 'd'Egville' violin once owned by Yehudi Menuhin.
He was even thought to have a special connection to Satan, and fellow musicians and the public flocked to his concerts, trying to figure out how he performed such magic on his Guarnerius.
Velvety tones of the 1715 Guarnerius cello were perfect for slow movement soul-searching, but a wider dynamic range would have been more appropriate for a 20th century concerto.
Tim Vogler plays a violin by Giovanni Battista Guadagnini that dates from Piacenza in 1748; Frank Reinecke's violin is by Niccolo Bergonzi and dates back to 1761; Stefan Fehlandt is the odd one out with a viola by Ritz Iwata, made in Amsterdam in 1992; and Stephan Forck's cello is perhaps the most impressive of all - it's by Andreas Guarnerius in 1694