guilder

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guil·der

 (gĭl′dər)
n.
The primary unit of currency in the Netherlands before the adoption of the euro.

[Middle English gilder, alteration of Middle Dutch gulden, golden; see ghel- in Indo-European roots.]

guilder

(ˈɡɪldə) or

gilder

;

gulden

n, pl -ders, -der, -dens or -den
1. (Currencies) Also called: florin the former standard monetary unit of the Netherlands, divided into 100 cents; replaced by the euro in 2002
2. (Currencies) the standard monetary unit of Curaçao and Sint Maarten, divided into 100 cents
3. (Historical Terms) any of various former gold or silver coins of Germany, Austria, or the Netherlands
[C15: changed from Middle Dutch gulden, literally: golden]

guil•der

(ˈgɪl dər)

n.
1. the basic currency of the Netherlands, which has a fixed value relative to the euro.
2. the basic monetary unit of the Netherlands Antilles and Suriname.
3. a former gold coin of the Netherlands; florin.
4. the Austrian florin.
5. any of various gold coins formerly issued by German states.
Also called gulden.
[1425–75; < Middle Dutch gulden gulden]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.guilder - the basic unit of money in Surinameguilder - the basic unit of money in Suriname; equal to 100 cents
Surinamese monetary unit - monetary unit in Suriname
2.guilder - formerly the basic unit of money in the Netherlands; equal to 100 cents
cent - a fractional monetary unit of several countries
Dutch monetary unit - monetary unit in the Netherlands
Translations
gulden
den hollandske gyldengylden
guldenholland forint
gyllini
guldenis
gulden

guilder

[ˈgɪldə>ʳ] N (guilders or guilder (pl)) → florín m (holandés)

guilder

nGulden m
References in classic literature ?
So it be well for you, my Lord, to pay old Til well and add a few guilders for the peace of her tongue if you would that your prisoner find peace in old Til's house.
Mynheer van Baerle the father had amassed in the Indian trade three or four hundred thousand guilders, which Mynheer van Baerle the son, at the death of his dear and worthy parents, found still quite new, although one set of them bore the date of coinage of 1640, and the other that of
1610, a fact which proved that they were guilders of Van Baerle the father and of Van Baerle the grandfather; but we will inform the reader at once that these three or four hundred thousand guilders were only the pocket money, or sort of purse, for Cornelius van Baerle, the hero of this story, as his landed property in the province yielded him an income of about ten thousand guilders a year.
Your time to die will also come; and if you are not then so fortunate as to have a son, you will let my name grow extinct, and my guilders, which no one has ever fingered but my father, myself, and the coiner, will have the surprise of passing to an unknown master.
Having given utterance to this paternal advice, the worthy Mynheer van Baerle died, to the intense grief of his son Cornelius, who cared very little for the guilders, and very much for his father.
Van Baerle began by expending his yearly revenue in laying the groundwork of his collection, after which he broke in upon his new guilders to bring it to perfection.
At the time when Cornelius van Baerle began to devote himself to tulip-growing, expending on this hobby his yearly revenue and the guilders of his father, there was at Dort, living next door to him, a citizen of the name of Isaac Boxtel who from the age when he was able to think for himself had indulged the same fancy, and who was in ecstasies at the mere mention of the word "tulban," which
Boxtel at once pictured to himself this learned man, with a capital of four hundred thousand and a yearly income of ten thousand guilders, devoting all his intellectual and financial resources to the cultivation of the tulip.
Well, sirrah, leave your jesting, and take these guilders.
A certificate of debt, found in a regional archive, attests that Mittenwalde lent Berlin 400 guilders on May 28 1562, to be repaid with six percent interest per year.
1626: Manhattan island was bought from local Indians by Dutch settler Peter Minuit for trade goods worth 60 guilders - estimated as being worth about pounds 1,000 in modern terms.
MP Francis Guilders expressed outrage at the situation when he said, "Europe has no right to be proud of its positions.