mens rea

(redirected from Guilty mind)
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mens rea

(ˈmɛnz ˈreɪə)
n
(Law) law a criminal intention or knowledge that an act is wrong. It is assumed to be an ingredient of all criminal offences although some minor statutory offences are punishable irrespective of it. Compare actus reus
[Latin, literally: guilty mind]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mens rea - (law) criminal intentmens rea - (law) criminal intent; the thoughts and intentions behind a wrongful act (including knowledge that the act is illegal); often at issue in murder trials
planning, preparation, provision - the cognitive process of thinking about what you will do in the event of something happening; "his planning for retirement was hindered by several uncertainties"
premeditation - (law) thought and intention to commit a crime well in advance of the crime; goes to show criminal intent
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
References in classic literature ?
The guilty mind of Turlington was far from feeling satisfied with the meager description of the stranger thus rendered.
The Supreme Court stated that crimes against humanity consist of a criminal act and a guilty mind.
powerful evidence of a guilty mind on the part of Abacus consistent with Worldspan's complaint; and along with the other evidence adduced on other issues in these proceedings, it appears to form part of a general pattern of dishonesty by Abacus; and even if it were not, it amounts (at least) to a reckless disregard for Abacus's own contractual obligations towards safeguarding from misappropriation Worldspan's confidential and proprietary information.
In legal circles, they call that evidence of a guilty mind.
It must be proved that an accused person committed an offence with a guilty mind -- that he or she knew what they were about to do was a criminal act but did it anyway.
Criminal statutes that create substantive offenses involving body armor require a defendant to possess a guilty mind (mens rea) while simultaneously committing a wrongful deed (actus reus).