Gurindji


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Gurindji

(ɡʊˈrɪndʒɪ)
n
1. (Peoples) an Aboriginal people of N central Australia
2. (Languages) the language of this people
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Stockmen employed by pastoral companies fought to secure the fertile plains, while the resisting Wardaman, Ngarinman, Karangpurru, Gurindji, Miriwung, and other Aboriginal groups took refuge in the gorges.
In 1976, Gurindji elder Pincher Nyurrmiyarri, proposed a 'both-ways' schooling model.
127) When, in 1966, the Northern Territory's Gurindji people set up a strike camp and demanded the return of their ancestral land, the Waterside Workers Federation and building unions provided support.
that at a time when protests were occurring over payment of equal wages in the pastoral industry, leading to the landmark walk-off from Wave Hill Station by the Gurindji people in 1966, Aboriginal men on the south coast were picking and choosing which sawmills they worked in, based on the wages that were being offered.
While the Wave Hill strike was resolved favourably for the Gurindji peoples, with Whitlam handing over 3236 square kilometres of land at Wave Hill to the rightful owners, and the eventual passing of the Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act by the Fraser government in 1976 (Summers, 2001: 194), the matter of Indigenous land rights was relegated as a minor issue until the early 1990s, when the landmark case of Eddie Mabo and others v.
hands, as a symbol of giving back land to the Gurindji people.
Patrick McConvell's paper discusses the Gurindji names--part of 'Blackfella Law'--which are not transient but assigned by dreamings.
The film, The Unlucky Australians, will show Frank Hardy's journey to Wave Hill in the Northern Territory where he helped the Gurindji Aboriginal tribe in its struggle for better working conditions and land rights.
Called The Unlucky Australians, the film will concentrate on Hardy's journey to Wave Hill in the Northern Territory, where he helped the Gurindji Aboriginal tribe in its struggle for better working conditions and land rights.
In 1975, at a ceremony for the handing back of land to the Gurindji people, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam symbolically poured sand into the hands of Aboriginal elder Vincent Lingiari.
Exhibit 37 to Land Claim by Gurindji to Dagaragu Station.