hacienda

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Related to Hacienda system: Encomienda system

ha·ci·en·da

 (hä′sē-ĕn′də, ä′sē-)
n.
1. A large estate in a Spanish-speaking region.
2. The house of the owner of such an estate.

[Spanish, from Latin facienda, things to be done, from neuter pl. gerundive of facere, to do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

hacienda

(ˌhæsɪˈɛndə)
(in Spain or Spanish-speaking countries) n
1. (Agriculture)
a. a ranch or large estate
b. any substantial stock-raising, mining, or manufacturing establishment in the country
2. (Architecture) the main house on such a ranch or plantation
[C18: from Spanish, from Latin facienda things to be done, from facere to do]

ha•ci•en•da

(ˌhɑ siˈɛn də)

n., pl. -das. (in Spanish America)
1. a large landed estate, esp. one used for farming or ranching.
2. the main house on such an estate.
[1710–20; < Sp]

hacienda

A Spanish word for a large ranch or ranch-house.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hacienda - a large estate in Spanish-speaking countrieshacienda - a large estate in Spanish-speaking countries
hacienda - the main house on a ranch or large estate
acres, demesne, landed estate, estate, land - extensive landed property (especially in the country) retained by the owner for his own use; "the family owned a large estate on Long Island"
2.hacienda - the main house on a ranch or large estate
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
hacienda - a large estate in Spanish-speaking countries
Translations

hacienda

[ˌhæsɪˈendə] N (US) → hacienda f

hacienda

nHazienda f
References in periodicals archive ?
of Madison-Wisconsin) examines the ways in which irrigation, and therefore agriculture and therefore social culture developed from the prehispanic societies in a region of the Peruvian Andes through the hacienda system and recent agrarian reforms.
While acknowledging the links between land inequality and the colonial encomienda and hacienda systems and the links between the uneven spread of literacy and political voice from the colonial legacy of racial and ethnic discrimination, he challenges the idea that inequality has been persistent throughout the post-independence era, arguing that forces of modernization unleashed by the ruptures of World War I and the Great Depression, namely urbanization, industrialization, and ideological change, had far ranging consequences for the distributive policies of the 20th century and greatly changed the context in which the colonial legacies were operating.