haematophagous


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haematophagous

(ˌhiːməˈtɒfəɡəs; ˌhɛm-) or

hematophagous

adj
(Zoology) (of certain animals) feeding on blood
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The haematophagous mites are white on an empty stomach and red after meals.
Ixodid ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) are the most important haematophagous arthropod vectors of infectious agent to domestic livestock and wild animals, attack a broad range of vertebrates and transmit a great diversity of pathogenic microorganisms (Yu et al.
Linking global warning, metabolic rate of haematophagous vectors and the transmission of infectious diseases.
Haematophagous bats in Brazil, their role in rabies transmission, impact on public health, livestock industry and alternatives to an indiscriminate reduction of bat population.
Ticks are highly specialized obligate haematophagous ectoparasites of mammals, birds and reptiles, distributed worldwide and are of enormous medical and veterinary relevance owing to the direct damage they cause to their hosts and as vectors of a large variety of human and animal pathogens.
Further evidence showed that haematophagous arthropod saliva contains active protein components that are able to modify the haemostasis and cellular immune responses and thus induce specific IgG antibodies in people living in endemic areas.
Identification of bloodmeals in haematophagous Diptera by cytochrome B heteroduplex analysis.
Mechanical transmission of trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and yaws through the agency of non-biting haematophagous flies.
Females of most species of the Corethrellidae are haematophagous and feed on anuran blood to obtain protein for egg development (Williams & Edman 1968; McKeever 1977; McKeever & French 1991).
They are haematophagous (feeds on blood), and strictly host specific to humans.
Examples of ectoparasites associated with northern mockingbirds include mites (Knemidokoptidae, Macronyssidae, Proctophyllodidae, and Trombiculidae; Ventura, 1968; Phillis and Cromroy, 1972; McClure, 1987, 1989; Latta and O'Connor, 2001), ticks (Ixodidae; Wilson and Durden, 2003), lice (Menoponidae and Philopteridae; Burmeister, 1838; Cicchino and Emerson, 1983; Wilson and Durden, 2003), and haematophagous flies (Muscidae; Ventura, 1968), some of which potentially could be observed in nests of lark sparrows as a result of behavior associated with re-use of nests.