Hagiographa


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Hagiographa: hagiography, Ketubim

Hag·i·og·ra·pha

 (hăg′ē-ŏg′rə-fə, hā′jē-)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb) Bible
The Writings.

[Late Latin, from Late Greek, from neuter pl. of hagiographos, written by inspiration, scriptural : Greek hagio-, hagio- + Greek -graphos, written (from graphein, to write; see -graph).]

Hagiographa

(ˌhæɡɪˈɒɡrəfə)
n
1. (Bible) the third of the three main parts into which the books of the Old Testament are divided in Jewish tradition (the other two parts being the Law and the Prophets), comprising Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles. Also called: Writings
2. (Judaism) the third of the three main parts into which the books of the Old Testament are divided in Jewish tradition (the other two parts being the Law and the Prophets), comprising Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles. Also called: Writings

Hag•i•og•ra•pha

(ˌhæg iˈɒg rə fə, ˌheɪ dʒi-)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the third of the three Jewish divisions of the Old Testament, variously arranged, but usu. comprising the Psalms, Proverbs, Job, Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles. Also called the Writings. Compare Pentateuch, Prophets.
[< Late Latin < Greek: sacred writings]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hagiographa - the third of three divisions of the Hebrew ScripturesHagiographa - the third of three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures
Book of Ruth, Ruth - a book of the Old Testament that tells the story of Ruth who was not an Israelite but who married an Israelite and who stayed with her mother-in-law Naomi after her husband died
1 Chronicles, I Chronicles - the first of two Old Testament books telling the history of Judah and Israel until the return from the Babylonian Captivity in 536 BC
2 Chronicles, II Chronicles - the second of two Old Testament books telling the history of Judah and Israel until the return from the Babylonian Captivity in 536 BC
Book of Ezra, Ezra - an Old Testament book telling of a rabbi's efforts in the 5th century BC to reconstitute Jewish law and worship in Jerusalem after the Babylonian Captivity
Book of Nehemiah, Nehemiah - an Old Testament book telling how a Jewish official at the court of Artaxerxes I in 444 BC became a leader in rebuilding Jerusalem after the Babylonian Captivity
Book of Esther, Esther - an Old Testament book telling of a beautiful Jewess who became queen of Persia and saved her people from massacre
Book of Job, Job - a book in the Old Testament containing Job's pleas to God about his afflictions and God's reply
Book of Psalms, Psalms - an Old Testament book consisting of a collection of 150 Psalms
Book of Proverbs, Proverbs - an Old Testament book consisting of proverbs from various Israeli sages (including Solomon)
Book of Ecclesiastes, Ecclesiastes - an Old Testament book consisting of reflections on the vanity of human life; is traditionally attributed to Solomon but probably was written about 250 BC
Canticle of Canticles, Canticles, Song of Solomon, Song of Songs - an Old Testament book consisting of a collection of love poems traditionally attributed to Solomon but actually written much later
Book of Lamentations, Lamentations - an Old Testament book lamenting the desolation of Judah after the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 BC; traditionally attributed to the prophet Jeremiah
Book of Daniel, Book of the Prophet Daniel, Daniel - an Old Testament book that tells of the apocalyptic visions and the experiences of Daniel in the court of Nebuchadnezzar
Hebrew Scripture, Tanach, Tanakh - the Jewish scriptures which consist of three divisions--the Torah and the Prophets and the Writings
References in periodicals archive ?
A different homiletical approach is ascribed to Elijah Gaon of Vilna, who is thought to have seen in the Talmudic debate (TB Shabbat 115a-b) about rescuing books from a fire on the Sabbath a halakhic dictum banning the study of Ketuvim (the Hagiographa or "Writings") on Shabbat.
In addition to discussions based on the Mishnah and halakhic traditions, it also presents scriptural exegesis, commentary on the hagiographa, aggadic material, moralizing and rhetoric, historical traditions, medicine and natural sciences, and much more.
Did existing exegetical traditions control the choice of a verse from the Hagiographa as the text for the proem to a midrashic exposition of a pentateuchal passage, for example when the Song of Songs is cited in connection with the exodus narrative?