Hakenkreuz


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Hakenkreuz: Gammadion

Ha·ken·kreuz

 (hä′kən-kroits′)
n.
A swastika.

[German : Haken, hook (from Middle High German hāken; see haček) + Kreuz, cross (from Middle High German kriuze; see kreuzer).]

Hakenkreuz

(ˈhɑːkənˌkrɔɪts)
n
(Historical Terms) the swastika
[literally: hooked cross]

hakenkreuz

A German word meaning hooked cross, used to mean the swastika.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hakenkreuz - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third ReichHakenkreuz - the official emblem of the Nazi Party and the Third Reich; a cross with the arms bent at right angles in a clockwise direction
tetraskele, tetraskelion - a figure consisting of four stylized human arms or legs (or bent lines) radiating from a center
allegory, emblem - a visible symbol representing an abstract idea
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
References in periodicals archive ?
Janta L, Rieck H, Riemenschneider M, 1989 Kreis Ahrweiler unter dem Hakenkreuz (Landkreis Ahrweiler, Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler)
In the 1990s SNPU's symbol was suspiciously similar to the Hakenkreuz (hook-cross or swastika) used by the Nazis and the symbol continues to be used by the SNA, giving rise to Western press reports of the "neo-Nazi" Azov, although they now claim that the symbol stands for "SN" (Slava Natsii [Glory to the Nation]).
Schacht, 76 Jahre meines Lebens, Bad Worishofen: Kindler und Schiermeyer, 1953; and Christopher Kopper, Bankiers unterm Hakenkreuz, Munich: Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag, 2008; and for Schwerin, see as well L.
A balder instance is the large Hakenkreuz carved into the gate of the monastery school the young Adi attends.
In this role, he founded the pro-Nazi journal Christenkreuz und Hakenkreuz (Cross and Swastika).
Mallmann and Cuppers have published the results of their research in book-length form in Halbmond und Hakenkreuz.
The major history of the Temple Society is Paul Sauer's Holy Land, although a history of their involvement with the Nazi Party Auslandorganisation can be found in Ralf Balke, Hakenkreuz im Heiligen Land: die NSDAP-Landesgruppe Palastina (Erfurt: Sutton, 2001).