hall of mirrors


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hall of mirrors

n.
1. A carnival or amusement park attraction consisting of a maze or series of passageways lined with mirrors, especially curved mirrors giving distorted reflections.
2. A confusing or disorienting situation in which it is difficult to distinguish between truth and illusion or between competing versions of reality. In both senses also called house of mirrors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
WHAT'S HAPPENING The Royal Serenade in the Hall of Mirrors is an artistic spectacle with baroque dancers and musicians.
Ellis ends Hall of Mirrors with an excellent understanding of real morality that offers a third way of looking at right and wrong--beyond black and white law--by promoting the tenets of Existentialist burden and the reliance of identity to foster the correct choice of acting authentically in a bind, it shows us that actions do really speak louder than words.
The Farnese Gallery was one of the models for the Hall of Mirrors (1678-84), the subject of Lagerlof's third chapter on omnipotence.
Guests will be able to take a private guided tour of the celebrated palace whose exclusive attractions include The Hall of Mirrors, the King's Grand Apartments and formal gardens with fountains and water attractions.
Summary: For those familiar with the ins-and-outs of trademark law, navigating a hall of mirrors can be an appropriate metaphor.
The event will be held in the Hall of Mirrors at the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, Saturday, April 12, beginning with cocktails at 6 p.
The fact that this particular De Palma scene is itself a remake of sorts--an homage to James Stewart trailing Kim Novak through San Francisco's Legion of Honor in Alfred Hitchcock's 1958 Vertigo--adds another layer to Dellsperger's simultaneously reverent and cheeky hall of mirrors.
Chateau D'Espoir's 94-foot golden limestone gallery has seven crystal chandeliers modeled after those in the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles.
Being held at the Hall of Mirrors at Siam Paragon, the prestigious shopping mall in Bangkoks upscale shopping district, the photography exhibition is part of the series of events in both countries to celebrate the 60th anniversary of Pakistan-Thailand diplomatic relations.
Within the palace's exuberant Hall of Mirrors a stage had been erected at the top of a hidden staircase overhung with yet another massive chandelier, from which the orchestra emerged to deliver a programme they obviously delighted in performing, so infectious were their smiles to each other: Wagner's Siegfried Idyll (so appropriate in this palace of the Wagner-mad Ludwig), Henze's reduced transcription of the same composer's Wesendonck-Lieder, mezzo Ann Katrin Naidu charismatically committed, but a soloist of several different timbres across her voice, Pergolesi's Orpheus-inspired cantata Nel chiuso centro, Christiane Oelze's soprano dramatic and intense (and I'm surprised the chandeliers remained unshattered), and a witty Stravinsky Pulcinella Suite.
Starring Jason Tompkins, Dawn French, Imelda Staunton, Daniel Kaluuya and Pemberton and Shearsmith, it's a bit like walking through a hall of mirrors and calling it a BBC comedy drama.