Hall-Jones


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Hall-Jones

(ˈhɔːlˈdʒəʊnz)
n
(Biography) Sir William. 1851–1936, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1906)
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Historian and author John Hall-Jones described it as "a truly moving sight" and it is one which evokes Resolution in her snug berth.
Cook's men felled a large number of the point's trees (almost an acre according to Hall-Jones who quotes Wales as saying that they cut down and destroyed "more trees and curious shrubs and plants that would in London have sold for one hundred pounds" (2)) to make a clear spot for an observatory.
Historian John Hall-Jones was engaged by the Hydrographic Office to provide notes on historical information, the Department of Conservation provided information on local fauna and so on.
One of the champions of this movement in Manitoba was School Inspector Marshall Hall-Jones whose East-Central Inspectoral District included the Starbuck area.
Hall-Jones describes another challenge in convincing citizens: "When consolidation was first proposed in Manitoba in 1904 as the best remedy in view, many who heard the plan at all gave it no thought, merely treating it as a new fad set forth by over-zealous educationalists.
During Knox's teaching career he directed 18 doctoral students and 15 masters students whose careers have reflected well on his training as they serve as museum directors, teachers and researchers at respected institutions; their own students are carrying on the Hall-Jones tradition.