Hamburg

(redirected from Hamburgs)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Ham·burg

 (hăm′bûrg′, häm′bo͝org′, -bo͝ork′)
A city of northern Germany on the Elbe River northeast of Bremen. Founded by Charlemagne in the early ninth century, the city quickly grew in commercial importance and in 1241 formed an alliance with Lübeck that became the basis for the Hanseatic League. Today Hamburg is a major port and financial, industrial, and cultural center.

Hamburg

(ˈhæmbɜːɡ)
n
(Placename) a city-state and port in NW Germany, on the River Elbe: the largest port in Germany; a founder member of the Hanseatic League; became a free imperial city in 1510 and a state of the German empire in 1871; university (1919); extensive shipyards. Pop: 1 734 083 (2003 est)

Ham•burg

(ˈhæm bɜrg, ˈhɑm bʊərg)

n.
a seaport and state in N Germany, on the Elbe River. 1,708.000; 292 sq. mi. (755 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hamburg - a port city in northern Germany on the Elbe River that was founded by Charlemagne in the 9th century and is today the largest port in Germany; in 1241 it formed an alliance with Lubeck that became the basis for the Hanseatic League
Hanseatic League - a commercial and defensive confederation of free cities in northern Germany and surrounding areas; formed in 1241 and most influential in the 14th century when it included over 100 towns and functioned as an independent political power; the last official assembly was held in 1669
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
Translations
Hamburk
Hamborg
Hampuri
Hamburg
Hamborg
ハンブルグ
Hamburg

Hamburg

[ˈhæmbɜːg] NHamburgo m

Hamburg

[ˈhæmbɜːrg] nHambourg

Hamburg

[ˈhæmbɜːg] nAmburgo f
References in classic literature ?
After a brief rest at Hamburg, we made preparations for a long pedestrian trip southward in the soft spring weather, but at the last moment we changed the program, for private reasons, and took the express-train.
It had seemed to me, in the many anxious considerations I had given the point, almost indifferent what port we made for - Hamburg, Rotterdam, Antwerp - the place signified little, so that he was got out of England.
The Pereire, of the French Transatlantic Company, whose admirable steamers are equal to any in speed and comfort, did not leave until the 14th; the Hamburg boats did not go directly to Liverpool or London, but to Havre; and the additional trip from Havre to Southampton would render Phileas Fogg's last efforts of no avail.