Edward

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Ed·ward 1

 (ĕd′wərd) Known as "the Confessor." 1003?-1066.
King of the English (1042-1066) whose reign was marked by political conflict between Norman and English groups.

Ed·ward 2

 (ĕd′wərd)Prince of Wales. Known as "the Black Prince." 1330-1376.
English soldier during the Hundred Years' War. The eldest son of Edward III, he fought at Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356), where the English forces captured John II of France.

Edward

(ˈɛdwəd)
n
(Placename) Lake Edward a lake in central Africa, between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo in the Great Rift Valley: empties through the Semliki River into Lake Albert. Area: about 2150 sq km (830 sq miles). Former official name: Lake Amin

Edward

(ˈɛdwəd)
n
1. (Biography) known as the Black Prince. 1330–76, Prince of Wales, the son of Edward III of England. He won victories over the French at Crécy (1346) and Poitiers (1356) in the Hundred Years' War
2. (Biography) Prince. born 1964, Earl of Wessex, third son of Elizabeth II of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In 1999 he married Sophie Rhys-Jones (born 1965); their daughter Louise was born in 2003 and their son James in 2007

Ed•ward

(ˈɛd wərd)

n.
1. Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall ( “The Black Prince” ), 1330–76, English military leader (son of Edward III).
2. Lake, a lake in central Africa, between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo: a source of the Nile. 830 sq. mi. (2150 sq. km).

Ed•ward

(ˈɛd wərd)
n.
1. Edward I, ( “Edward Longshanks” ) 1239–1307, king of England 1272–1307 (son of Henry III).
2. Edward II, 1284–1327, king of England 1307–27 (son of Edward I).
3. Edward III, 1312–77, king of England 1327–77 (son of Edward II).
4. Edward IV, 1442–83, king of England 1461–70, 1471–83: 1st king of the house of York.
5. Edward V, 1470–83, king of England 1483 (son of Edward IV).
6. Edward VI, 1537–53, king of England 1547–53 (son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour).
7. Edward VII, (Albert Edward) ( “the Peacemaker” ) 1841–1910, king of Great Britain and Ireland 1901–10 (son of Queen Victoria).
8. Edward VIII, (Duke of Windsor) 1894–1972, king of Great Britain 1936: abdicated (son of George V; brother of George VI).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Edward - King of England and Ireland in 1936Edward - King of England and Ireland in 1936; his marriage to Wallis Warfield Simpson created a constitutional crisis leading to his abdication (1894-1972)
House of Windsor, Windsor - the British royal family since 1917
2.Edward - King of England from 1901 to 1910Edward - King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha - the name of the royal family that ruled Great Britain from 1901-1917; the name was changed to Windsor in 1917 in response to anti-German feelings in World War I
3.Edward - King of England and Ireland from 1547 to 1553Edward - King of England and Ireland from 1547 to 1553; son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour; died of tuberculosis (1537-1553)
4.Edward - King of England who was crowned at the age of 13 on the death of his father Edward IV but was immediately confined to the Tower of London where he and his younger brother were murdered (1470-1483)Edward - King of England who was crowned at the age of 13 on the death of his father Edward IV but was immediately confined to the Tower of London where he and his younger brother were murdered (1470-1483)
5.Edward - King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483Edward - King of England from 1461 to 1470 and from 1471 to 1483; was dethroned in 1470 but regained the throne in 1471 by his victory at the battle of Tewkesbury (1442-1483)
6.Edward - son of Edward II and King of England from 1327-1377Edward - son of Edward II and King of England from 1327-1377; his claim to the French throne provoked the Hundred Years' War; his reign was marked by an epidemic of the Black Plague and by the emergence of the House of Commons as the powerful arm of British Parliament (1312-1377)
7.Edward - King of England from 1307 to 1327 and son of Edward IEdward - King of England from 1307 to 1327 and son of Edward I; was defeated at Bannockburn by the Scots led by Robert the Bruce; was deposed and died in prison (1284-1327)
8.Edward - King of England from 1272 to 1307Edward - King of England from 1272 to 1307; conquered Wales (1239-1307)
9.Edward - third son of Elizabeth II (born in 1964)
10.Edward - son of Edward III who defeated the French at Crecy and Poitiers in the Hundred Years' War (1330-1376)Edward - son of Edward III who defeated the French at Crecy and Poitiers in the Hundred Years' War (1330-1376)
Translations

Edward

[ˈedwəd] NEduardo
Edward the ConfessorEduardo el Confesor

Edward

nEduard m
References in periodicals archive ?
Edward I was known as Longshanks because of his height, and also as the Hammer of the Scots because of his involvement in the Scottish succession when he decided the competing claims of John Balliol and Robert Bruce to the Scottish Crown.
Edward I (17 June 1239-7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots, was King of England from 1272 to 1307.
Edward I, the Hammer of the Scots, visited Elgin in 1296 calling it a "good town", and refrained from burning it down.
England, led by Phil De Glanville ran in four tries and Hammer of the Scots Paul Grayson landed five penalties.
In the dark age of 13th Century Britain, battle ripens as Edward I - Hammer of the Scots and castle builder of Wales - wields his power.
Hammer of the Scots Edward I must be turning in his Westminster Abbey tomb.
The chief executioner of the downfall was Matt Burke, who will be known from now on rightly as the Hammer of the Scots.
Wallaby full-back Matthew Burke was the hammer of the Scots at Murrayfield yesterday.
In 1292,King Edward I, 6ft 2ins "Malleus Scottorium - the hammer of the Scots - spent a night in Woodhorn and another in Warkworth castle where, in what were turbulent borderlands, he'd enjoy the best 13th Century security and some comfort.
It seems Chris Paterson, the man whose 100 per cent strike rate at the World Cup cast a shadow over Jonny Wilkinson's 60, has a challenger and Callard, Hammer of the Scots in his playing days, took time last week to tweak the metronomic technique of the youngish upstart.