Hampton


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Hamp·ton

 (hămp′tən)
1. A historic section of London, England. It includes Hampton Court Palace, built by Cardinal Wolsey in 1515 and appropriated by Henry VIII around 1526. George II was the last to use it as a royal residence, and much of the palace is now open to the public.
2. An independent city of southeast Virginia opposite Norfolk on Hampton Roads, the outlet of three rivers into Chesapeake Bay. Settled by colonists from Jamestown in 1610, the city was sacked by the British in the War of 1812 and was almost burned to the ground by Confederates in 1861 to prevent its occupation by Union troops.

Hampton

(ˈhæmptən)
n
1. (Placename) a city in SE Virginia, on the harbour of Hampton Roads on Chesapeake Bay. Pop: 146 878 (2003 est)
2. (Placename) a district of the Greater London borough of Richmond-upon-Thames, on the River Thames: famous for Hampton Court Palace (built in 1515 by Cardinal Wolsey)

Hampton

(ˈhæmptən)
n
1. (Biography) Christopher James. born 1946, British playwright: his works include When Did You Last See My Mother? (1964), the screenplay for the film Dangerous Liaisons (1988), the book for the musical Sunset Boulevard (1993), and the screenplay for the film Atonement (2007)
2. (Biography) Lionel. 1913–2002, US jazz-band leader and vibraphone player

Hamp•ton

(ˈhæmp tən)

n.
1. Lionel, born 1913, U.S. jazz vibraphonist.
2. Wade, 1818–1902, Confederate general: U.S. senator 1879–91.
3. a city in SE Virginia, on Chesapeake Bay. 138,757.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hampton - United States musician who was the first to use the vibraphone as a jazz instrument (1913-2002)
References in classic literature ?
He had the training that a coloured youth receives at Hampton, which, indeed, the autobiography does explain.
Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Hampton Institute and the intimate friend of General Armstrong during the whole period of his educational work.
Years later, to the crash of battle-music, Saxon kings and Saxon revelry were buried side by side, and Kingston's greatness passed away for a time, to rise once more when Hampton Court became the palace of the Tudors and the Stuarts, and the royal barges strained at their moorings on the river's bank, and bright-cloaked gallants swaggered down the water-steps to cry: "What Ferry, ho
Harris, however, said he had done enough for a bit, and proposed that I should take a turn; so, as we were in, I got out and took the tow-line, and ran the boat on past Hampton Court.
We got to Hampton Court without misadventure, our minds full of strange and unfamiliar appearances, and at Hampton Court our eyes were relieved to find a patch of green that had escaped the suf- focating drift.
Perhaps, too, thou hast seen the gallery of beauties at Hampton Court.
I enjoyed the trips to Hampton Court and the Kensington Museum more than anything else, for at Hampton I saw Raphael's cartoons, and at the Museum, rooms full of pictures by Turner, Lawrence, Reynolds, Hogarth, and the other great creatures.
Investing a small sum which he had amassed since leaving his native village, in merchandise suited to the American market, he embarked, in the month of November, 1783, in a ship bound to Baltimore, and arrived in Hampton Roads in the month of January.
Hampton Court was decided upon, in preference to Hampstead, for though Cassandra had dreamt as a child of the brigands of Hampstead, she had now transferred her affections completely and for ever to William III.
I think they said they were going to Hampton Court, and I rather believe they were taking a protege of mine, Ralph Denham, a very clever fellow, too, to amuse Cassandra.
My mother lives in a most primitive manner down in that dreary red-brick dungeon at Hampton Court,' said Gowan.
But here, even in my grand room of state, there wasn't anything in the nature of a picture except a thing the size of a bedquilt, which was either woven or knitted (it had darned places in it), and nothing in it was the right color or the right shape; and as for proportions, even Raphael himself couldn't have botched them more formidably, after all his practice on those nightmares they call his "celebrated Hampton Court cartoons.