Hancock


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Han·cock

 (hăn′kŏk′), Herbert Jeffrey Known as "Herbie." Born 1940.
American musician and composer of jazz and popular music. He is noted for his work with piano and electronic keyboard instruments.

Hancock

, John 1737-1793.
American politician and Revolutionary leader. He was president of the Continental Congress (1775-1777) and the first to sign the Declaration of Independence. Hancock later served nine terms as governor of Massachusetts (1780-1785 and 1787-1793).

Hancock

, Winfield Scott 1824-1886.
American Civil War general who defeated Robert E. Lee and George Pickett in the Gettysburg Campaign (1863).

Hancock

(ˈhænkɒk)
n
1. (Biography) Anthony John, known as Tony. 1924–68, British comedian, noted for his radio series Hancock's Half Hour
2. (Biography) John. 1737–93, American statesman; first signatory of the Declaration of Independence

Han•cock

(ˈhæn kɒk)

n.
1. John, 1737–93, American statesman: first signer of the Declaration of Independence.
2. Winfield Scott, 1824–86, Union general in the Civil War.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hancock - American revolutionary patriot who was president of the Continental CongressHancock - American revolutionary patriot who was president of the Continental Congress; was the first signer of the Declaration of Independence (1737-1793)
References in classic literature ?
If the truth must be told, the life of the aged loyalist has been of such a scrambling and unsettled character,--he has had so little choice of friends and been so often destitute of any,--that I doubt whether he would refuse a cup of kindness with either Oliver Cromwell or John Hancock,--to say nothing of any democrat now upon the stage.
Officers of the Custom House, too, which stood on the opposite side of King Street, often sat in the chair wagging their tongues against John Hancock.
Seven extra mouths sat down to breakfast: a Swede; a Chatham skipper; a boy from Hancock, Maine; one Duxbury, and three Provincetown men.
Our Aunt Hancock lived in the Governor's house, on Beacon Hill, at that time.
To be sure, they belonged to her neighbors, and there was no time to ask leave, but it was a national affair; our allies must be fed; and feeling sure that her patriotic friends would gladly lay their cows on the altar of their country, Madam Hancock covered herself with glory, by calmly issuing the command, 'Milk 'em
Uncle Hancock (a sweet man, my dears, though some call him mean now-a-days) was dead, and aunt had married Captain Scott.
And as we hurried up town, Joe Goose explained: "It's the Hancock Fire Brigade.
And, to save me, I can't remember whether the Hancock Fire Brigade was a republican or a democratic organisation.
And, oh, it wasn't John Barleycorn's fault that he didn't get me that night of the Hancock Fire Brigade.
It was the afternoon of my first day, along about four o'clock, when the boilers of the Governor Hancock exploded and she sank in sixty feet of water alongside the dock.
Every flat-car, box-car, coach, asthmatic switch engine, and even hand-car that mob of Spiggoties had shoved off the dock into sixty feet of water on top of the Governor Hancock.
Anyway Del Hancock and Aunt Sadie got married next day.