Hannibal


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Han·ni·bal 1

 (hăn′ə-bəl) 247-183? bc.
Carthaginian general who crossed the Alps in 218 with about 35,000 men and routed Roman armies at Lake Trasimeno (217) and Cannae (216). He was later defeated at the Battle of Zama (202).

Han·ni·bal 2

 (hăn′ə-bəl)
A city of northeast Missouri on the Mississippi River northwest of St. Louis. It is famous as the boyhood home of Mark Twain.

Hannibal

(ˈhænɪbəl)
n
(Biography) 247–182 bc, Carthaginian general; son of Hamilcar Barca. He commanded the Carthaginian army in the Second Punic War (218–201). After capturing Sagunto in Spain, he invaded Italy (218), crossing the Alps with an army of about 40 000 men and defeating the Romans at Trasimene (217) and Cannae (216). In 203 he was recalled to defend Carthage and was defeated by Scipio at Zama (202). He was later forced into exile and committed suicide to avoid capture

Han•ni•bal

(ˈhæn ə bəl)

n.
1. 247–183 B.C., Carthaginian general who crossed the Alps and invaded Italy (son of Hamilcar Barca).
2. a port in NE Missouri, on the Mississippi: Mark Twain's boyhood home. 18,811.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hannibal - general who commanded the Carthaginian army in the second Punic WarHannibal - general who commanded the Carthaginian army in the second Punic War; crossed the Alps and defeated the Romans but was recalled to defend Carthage and was defeated (247-182 BC)
2.Hannibal - a town in northeast Missouri on the Mississippi River; boyhood home of Mark Twain
Missouri, Show Me State, MO - a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union
Translations

Hannibal

[ˈhænɪbəl] NAníbal

Hannibal

[ˈhænɪbl] nAnnibale m
References in classic literature ?
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