hard power


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hard power

n
the ability to achieve one's goals by force, esp military force. Compare soft power
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is safe to say that hard power will continue to retract due to that fatigue.
Smart power is the ability to combine the hard power of coercion or payment with the soft power of attraction into a successful strategy.
Lawfare by opposition and allied civil society is gradually pushing the state to increasingly use hard power in the crack down against the masterminds of the illegal 'oath'.
Added to hard power, attraction can be a force multiplier.
The term "soft power" - the ability to affect others by attraction and persuasion rather than the hard power of coercion and payment - is sometimes used to describe any exercise of power that does not involve the use of force.
government's foreign-policy tools is needed in which geoeconomics is elevated to the same level as hard power and diplomacy.
The call for a revolutionary government in trying times such a now--when the biggest threats are not hard power, terrorists, or rebels, but fake news and divisive propaganda -- would be irresponsible.
The report said that Pakistani officials maintained that the US continues the use of hard power, 'despite knowing the policy has not worked during the past 16 years'.
Cohen does not reject the notion of soft power entirely, but his argument is that without the availability, and at crucial times the employment, of credible hard power, soft power cannot be relied on to protect Americas interests and those of its allies or others whom it might wish to support.
As such, we must rely much more heavily on hard power.
Despite the misadventures of hard power in places like Iraq and Afghanistan in recent years, Eliot Cohen demonstrates in his new book that he remains convinced military force must be an essential part of a states (specifically, the United States') response to issues arising in the contemporary world.
It adds that in effect, the vulgarization of such key academic terminology as "soft power" by the media, without clarifying the boundary between soft and hard power, may easily mislead the target audience and have consequences for shaping public opinions, creating serious political ramifications.