harmolodics

(redirected from Harmolodic)

harmolodics

(ˌhɑːməˈlɒdɪks)
n
(Jazz) (functioning as singular) jazz the technique of each musician in a group simultaneously improvising around the melodic and rhythmic patterns in a tune, rather than one musician improvising on its underlying harmonic pattern while the others play an accompaniment
[C20: of unknown origin]
ˌharmoˈlodic adj
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the real deal though, complete with adherence to the harmolodic system devised by Ornette Coleman, "Blood" remains the boss.
I want to share harmolodic theory with everyone, including classical musicians.
It's conversation that this godfather of the postwar jazz avant-garde is after, an exchange of ideas that parallels the internal flow of musical ideas in his self-developed form, which he calls harmolodics.
For sixty years, Ornette Coleman has been making waves in life and in music with his idea of harmolodics.
Listening to the pieces, it's hard to avoid thinking of Steve's namesake Ornette and the electrified harmolodic funk of his Prime Time band.
Coleman, who has finalized a deal with Polygram for his Harmolodic Records that will allow him both to make his own and produce other people's records for major-label distribution, put a costly brew onstage, thanks largely to his new label's corporate subsidies: a handheld cam, a boom-cam dolly with tracks laid along one side of the stage, a state-of-the-art mixing board and console.
Layin' In The Cut is an all-electric session, featuring guitarist Marc Ribot and those harmolodic kings Grant Calvin Weston and Jamaaladeen Tacuma on the drums and bass.
The harmolodic revolution led by Ornette Coleman has been crucial here.
Alto saxophonist Martin Speake did an exceptional job of involving Ornette Coleman's harmolodic hustle during last year's 60s festival.
A double LP (or single CD), one half with the "legendary quartet' of the 1950s, the other with harmolodic funksters Prime Time.
One disc features the original Quartet from 1957, with trumpeter Don Cherry, bassist Charlie Haden and drummer Billy Higgins; the other features his decade-old swaggering electric harmolodic foray into the twenty-first century, Prime Time, with bassists Jamaaladeen Tacuma and Al MacDowell, guitarists Bern Nix and Charlie Ellerbee, drummer Calvin Weston and Ornette's son Denardo on Roland drum-synthesis pads.
While Ornette, for instance, would fold funky rhythms into his own harmolodic concept, White did James Brown tunes like "Cold Sweat" and "I Got the Feelin'" as well as original material, all spiked with nerve-jangling verbal assaults and solos.