Hassidic


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Adj.1.Hassidic - of or relating to the Jewish Hasidim or its members or their beliefs and practices
Translations

Hassidic

[həˈsɪdɪk] ADJhasídico

Hassidic

adjchassidisch; Hassidic JewsHassidim pl, → Chassidim pl
References in periodicals archive ?
But Tamblyn wasn't attacking African-Americansshe was targeting Hassidic Jews.
He has close ties to many prominent rabbis and is also welcome in many other Hassidic circles.
The Sufi ghazal, the Zen koan, and the Hassidic parable--those traditions are alive here with transcendental mirth, lots of duende, and lots of sobriety.
The rich Hindu articulations of such images offer, Goshen-Gottstein suggests, points of deep spiritual resonance with the Hassidic emphasis on the cultivation of the imagination for meditatively envisioning, however falteringly, the incorporeal God.
A Hassidic parable recounts the story of a group of Jews who, sitting together in the local inn, decide to share their most intimate wishes with each other.
33) Major composers for the Reform synagogue, including Isadore Freed, Charles Davidson, and Lazar Weiner, created and published "Hassidic" Friday evening services for their synagogues, scored for cantor, choir and organ; Rabbi Judah Cahn, then of Long Island's Temple Israel, noted in his introduction to the publication of Freed's service that "[the] seeming paradox of Hassidic music in a Liberal American Temple" could be explained as appealing to Hasidic "joy" as a counterweight to Reform's intellectualism.
Malin will explore the intersection of ethnomusicology and music theory, using vignettes that involve a wordless Hassidic song called a "niggun" and Jewish Biblical chant.
Cossack dance, Hassidic dance, Balkan--so many different kinds of Jewish dances from around the world are completely available to me," Shechter says.
Knowing no English, he embarked on the treacherous journey from Krakow to London which saw him spending time in a Hassidic Jew community and trying to leave the area on a ship.
5) Often, the boldness of Hassidic rabbis when confronting God verges on rudeness, but, as Judith Stora-Sandor argues, all the accusations of having abandoned His people, all the invectives and the rage are but signs of the "lover's quarrel" (6) which, in her opinion, is the phrase which best describes the relationship between the Jews and their God.
In contrast to the Lithuanian school of Haredim that emphasizes study of the Talmud, Hassidic sects like Chabad give equal weight to the heart in the Jew's ties to God.