Sphingidae

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Related to Hawk-moth: sphinx moth, sphingid
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sphingidae - hawkmoths
arthropod family - any of the arthropods
Lepidoptera, order Lepidoptera - moths and butterflies
hawk moth, hawkmoth, hummingbird moth, sphingid, sphinx moth - any of various moths with long narrow forewings capable of powerful flight and hovering over flowers to feed
genus Manduca, Manduca - moths whose larvae are tobacco hornworms or tomato hornworms
Acherontia, genus Acherontia - death's-head moth
References in periodicals archive ?
The rarest of the migrant moths in recent weeks was the Bedstraw Hawk-moth at Kenfig - only the sixth for the county of Glamorgan despite its range being from western Europe across to Japan.
Staff at the National Wildflower Centre in Knowsley found five humming-bird hawk-moth caterpillars - of which only around 50 are reported each year - feasting on their Lady Bedstraw plants.
They show (clockwise from top left): A comma butterfly; a painted lady butterfly; an elephant hawk-moth caterpillar; a willow-herb hawk-moth; a bee inside a passion flower; and a peacock butterfly.
Warren Spencer, head of invertebrates at Bristol Zoo Gardens, said, 'The next two to three months will see a sequence of species emerging which people will claim never to have seen before in their lives, such as the dramatic Privet hawk-moth, Britain's largest resident hawk-moth, which people claim as foreign invaders.
Warren Spencer, head of Invertebrates at Bristol Zoo Gardens, said at the start of National Insect Week: 'The next two to three months will see a sequence of species emerging which people will claim never to have seen before in their lives, such as the dramatic privet hawk-moth, Britain's largest resident hawk-moth, which people claim as foreign invaders.
Moth-lovers are hoping to lure the hawk-moth to their gardens with the nectar of the deep tubular flowers of tobacco plants, which the moth likes to feed on using its 7.
Elaine Henderson ASINCE we don't have indigenous hummingbirds, it is likely to be a hummingbird hawk-moth.
Nothing humdrum about hawk-moth 6 In our garden the other day was what looked like a very, very small hummingbird.