Hawks


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hawk 1

 (hôk)
n.
1. Any of various birds of prey, especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo in the family Accipitridae, characteristically having a short hooked bill and strong claws used for seizing.
2. Any of various similar birds of prey.
3. A person who preys on others; a shark.
4.
a. One who demonstrates an actively aggressive or combative attitude, as in an argument.
b. A person who favors military force or action in order to carry out foreign policy.
intr.v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
1. To hunt with trained hawks.
2. To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk: "It was fun to watch the scattered snail kites ... lifting and falling in the wind as they hawked across the shining grass and water" (Peter Matthiessen).

[Middle English hauk, from Old English hafoc; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

hawk′ish adj.
hawk′ish·ly adv.
hawk′ish·ness n.

hawk 2

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To peddle goods aggressively, especially by calling out.
v.tr.
To peddle (goods) aggressively, especially by calling out.

[Middle English hauken, back-formation from hauker; see hawker.]

hawk 3

 (hôk)
v. hawked, hawk·ing, hawks
v.intr.
To clear or attempt to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
v.tr.
To clear the throat of (phlegm).
n.
An audible effort to clear the throat by expelling phlegm.

[Imitative.]

Hawks

 (hôks), Howard Winchester 1896-1977.
American filmmaker whose works include His Girl Friday (1940) and Red River (1948).

Hawks

(hɔːks)
n
(Biography) Howard (Winchester). 1896–1977, US film director. His films include Sergeant York (1941) and The Big Sleep (1946)
References in classic literature ?
They were exceptionally large, some almost as big as hawks.
So have I seen a bird with clipped wing, making affrighted broken circles in the air, vainly striving to escape the piratical hawks.
He was provided also with a cap, having around it more than one bell, about the size of those attached to hawks, which jingled as he turned his head to one side or other; and as he seldom remained a minute in the same posture, the sound might be considered as incessant.
I pass my life with my wife, children, and friends; my pursuits are hunting and fishing, but I keep neither hawks nor greyhounds, nothing but a tame partridge or a bold ferret or two; I have six dozen or so of books, some in our mother tongue, some Latin, some of them history, others devotional; those of chivalry have not as yet crossed the threshold of my door; I am more given to turning over the profane than the devotional, so long as they are books of honest entertainment that charm by their style and attract and interest by the invention they display, though of these there are very few in Spain.
It was composed of turtle soup made of the most delicate hawks bills, of a surmullet served with puff paste
On the branches of the cedars were perched large eagles; amid the foliage of the weeping willows were herons, solemnly standing on one leg; and on every hand were crows, ducks, hawks, wild birds, and a multitude of cranes, which the Japanese consider sacred, and which to their minds symbolise long life and prosperity.
The misfortune is great; but I think you have still a good number of falcons, sparrow hawks, and tiercets.
Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar, and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds had built their nests--owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupy their business in the waters.
The time is near when you shall pray Jove and all the gods in your flight, that your steeds may be swifter than hawks as they raise the dust on the plain and bear you back to your city.
Crooks suddenly broke up his feigned trading establishment, embarked his men and effects, and, after giving the astonished rear-guard of savages a galling and indignant message to take to their countrymen, pushed down the river with all speed, sparing neither oar nor paddle, day nor night, until fairly beyond the swoop of these river hawks.
It is well', the Saddhu whispered, jammed in the calling, shouting, bewildered press - a Persian greyhound between his feet and a cageful of yelling hawks under charge of a Rajput falconer in the small of his back.
Meantime, the Friar stood watching keenly for what might come to pass, holding in his fingers the while a pretty silver whistle, such as knights use for calling their hawks back to their wrists, which whistle always hung at his girdle along with his rosary.