Hawthorne effect

(redirected from Hawthorne experiments)
Also found in: Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Hawthorne experiments: Hawthorne studies

Hawthorne effect

(ˈhɔːˌθɔːn)
n
(Sociology) improvement in the performance of employees, students, etc, brought about by making changes in working methods, resulting from research into means of improving performance. Compare iatrogenic, placebo effect
[from the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne works in Chicago, USA, where it was discovered during experiments in the 1920s]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is as the author of `Human Problems of an Industrial Civilisation' which reports on the Hawthorne Experiments, that he is known for his contribution to management thinking, even though he disclaimed responsibility for the design and direction of the project.
Finally, she makes no mention of the Hawthorne experiments in which workers responded positively even to worsening conditions, suggesting that the psychology of welfare capitalism demands some attention, especially as it moves into strategies of worker counseling.
In an echo of the Hawthorne experiments, patients bonded with their non-physician case workers and appreciated that they could by-pass normal procedures when they had medical problems.