Hawthorne effect

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Hawthorne effect

(ˈhɔːˌθɔːn)
n
(Sociology) improvement in the performance of employees, students, etc, brought about by making changes in working methods, resulting from research into means of improving performance. Compare iatrogenic, placebo effect
[from the Western Electric Company's Hawthorne works in Chicago, USA, where it was discovered during experiments in the 1920s]
References in periodicals archive ?
Roethlisberger, conducted what are now known as the Hawthorne studies trying to discover the optimal length of work productivity.
The selections and supporting material cover issues of leadership, including transactional approaches and readings from Follett, Barnard, Fiedler, Schein, Chemers and Bolman and Deal; motivation, including background material on the Hawthorne studies and cognitive dissidence and work by Maslow, McGregor, VroomWright and Locke; individuals in teams and groups, including work by Alderfer, Majchrzak, Malhotra, Stamps and Lipnack; effects of the work environment, including work by Asch, Merton, Janis, Harvey and Schein; power and influence, including work by Mechanic, Etzioni, Kanter, Bies and Trip, and Hagberg; and organizational change, including background material on transformation and work by Lewin, Argyris, Senge, Greiner and Bennis.
Ross includes references to Elton Mayo's Hawthorne studies to substantiate his view that the new economy workplace appealed to workers' need for recognition and fulfillment.
The workers in the Hawthorne Studies were responding to various psychological factors that motivated their behavior.