quotient

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quo·tient

 (kwō′shənt)
n.
The number obtained by dividing one quantity by another. In 45 ÷ 3 = 15, 15 is the quotient.

[Middle English quocient, from Latin quotiēns, quotient-, how many times, from quot, how many; see kwo- in Indo-European roots.]

quotient

(ˈkwəʊʃənt)
n
1. (Mathematics)
a. the result of the division of one number or quantity by another
b. the integral part of the result of division
2. (Mathematics) a ratio of two numbers or quantities to be divided
[C15: from Latin quotiens how often]

quo•tient

(ˈkwoʊ ʃənt)

n.
the result of division; the number of times one quantity is contained in another.
[1400–50; late Middle English quocient, quociens < Latin quotiēns (adv.) how many times]

quo·tient

(kwō′shənt)
The number that results when one number is divided by another. If 6 is divided by 3, the quotient can be represented as 2, or as 6 ÷ 3, or as the fraction 6/3 .
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.quotient - the ratio of two quantities to be divided
proportion - the quotient obtained when the magnitude of a part is divided by the magnitude of the whole
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
2.quotient - the number obtained by division
number - a concept of quantity involving zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence"
Translations
podíl
kvotient
osamäärä
kvot

quotient

[ˈkwəʊʃənt] Ncociente m

quotient

[ˈkwəʊʃənt] nquotient m

quotient

n (Math) → Quotient m

quo·tient

n. cociente, cifra que resulta de una división;
achievement ______ de realización;
blood ______ sanguíneo;
growth ______ de crecimiento;
intelligence ______ de inteligencia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Estimated dietary intake of metal (DIM), chronic dietary intake (CDI) and non-carcinogenic hazard quotient (HQ) were used to assess the health risk of ingestion of toxic metals in Cucumis sativus fruit and the farm soil.
We calculated hazard quotients using the arithmetic mean and 95th percentile consumption rates (Table 1).
The study is based on Target Hazard Quotients (THQs), formula-derived measurements which provide an indication of risk based on known safe dose limits.