headnote


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head·note

 (hĕd′nōt′)
n.
A note placed at the beginning of a chapter, a page, or a document such as a report, that provides brief explanatory information.

headnote

(ˈhɛdˌnəʊt)
n
(Law) law a note added to the text of a case following a court decision
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References in periodicals archive ?
Two states that have contracted with LexisNexis for headnote writing and other editorial work authorize the publisher to secure copyright.
The headnote to Florida Ethics Opinion 78-3 states as follows:
Two weeks after the headnote, summaries of the cases are also available.
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner' could not have been written if Coleridge had not read Hearne's account of Native American Shaminism' (p161), and a chapter examines its effect on the poet's sense of how the object world is affected by superstition and guilt, both here and in 'Christabel' and in that curious collaboration with Wordsworth, 'The Three Graves', where Coleridge's headnote specifically references Hearne in defending the 'exclusively psychological' merits of the ballad.
One of the West headnote advantages is that the federal digest topics are roughly the same as those in the Florida Digest.
Each of the 120 texts is accompanied by a headnote written either by the editors themselves or younger researchers.
And why does fully one third of the headnote to "Traditional Orature" relate to a selection no longer in the text, when the editors' point that the texts reveal tensions between orature and literature could easily have been made with reference to other works?
The documentary appendix (constituting two-thirds of the entire volume) is well-chosen, and each document has a succinct and informative headnote that prepares the reader to understand what follows.
The recipe's headnote explains, `This is John Wayne's only line in the movie `The Greatest Story Ever Told.
And although each document's source is detailed following the entry's headnote, a bibliography of all the documents might be helpful for browsing.
As Caws says in her headnote to Part 27, "Thresholds," the documents she assembles "were chosen for their differing styles and not for the contingents of which they might be seen as token texts" (604) .
Gates introduces each letter with a contextual headnote, effectively giving a sense of the texture and variety of this life while providing basic information on dates, correspondents, key persons and events, and the manuscript itself.