heart rate

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heart rate

n. Abbr. HR
The number of heartbeats per unit of time, usually expressed as beats per minute.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heart rate - the rate at which the heart beatsheart rate - the rate at which the heart beats; usually measured to obtain a quick evaluation of a person's health
vital sign - sign of life; usually an indicator of a person's general physical condition; "he was still alive but his vital signs were weak"
femoral pulse - pulse of the femoral artery (felt in the groin)
radial pulse - pulse of the radial artery (felt in the wrist)
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
References in periodicals archive ?
Microsoft, however, refused to make any comment on the speculations of the heart-rate monitoring smartwatch.
Researchers compared the heart rates of 20 people who ate normal diets with those of 22 who ate 30 percent fewer calories and found that those on a calorie-restricted diet had significantly higher heart-rate variability.
The added heart-rate reduction that ivabradine provided on top of the beta-blocker "saved energy in a compromised myocardium," he said.
Given that ivabradine works exclusively by lowering heart rate, specifically targeting the heart-rate controlling "funny" ([I.
Increased heart rate and reduced heart-rate variability are associated with subclinical inflammation in middle-aged and elderly subjects with no apparent heart disease.
In a 2003 study, for example, Schmidt and his collaborators measured baroreflex over 24 hours by using a marker called heart-rate turbulence.
He got an answer on what has kept him from playing extended minutes because of a heart-rate issue.
A new tool on the market is the Mio[TM] Sport, a heart-rate monitor worn on the wrist.
Baroreflex sensitivity and heart-rate variability in prediction of total cardiac mortality after myocardial infarction.
I encourage the use of a heart-rate monitor that looks like a wristwatch, so people can watch their heart rate as they're exercising and not overdo it at the beginning," he adds.