heat shock protein

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Related to Heat-shock proteins: heat shock response

heat shock protein

n.
Any of a group of cellular proteins produced under physiological stress, such as high or low body temperature, that stabilize other cellular proteins and adjust cellular metabolism to cope with the stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
High temperature induces the synthesis of heat-shock proteins and the elevation of intracellular calcium in the coral Acropora grandis.
development of the Bioconductor Project, an open-source software system that delivers tools for high yield analysis of genomic data; novel imaging methods and treatments for oral/head and neck cancers; vitamin D as a safe policy to enhance targeted chemotherapeutics; imaging ways to study how radiation affects salivary gland function; work on heat-shock proteins to improve cancer therapy; and a new combination therapy to abstain prostate cancer recurrence by increasing an exclusive metabolic stress in prostate cells.
Heat-shock proteins as immunogenic bacterial antigens with the potential to induce and regulate autoimmune arthritis.
Heat-shock proteins, molecular chaperones, and the stress response: evolutionary and ecological physiology.
Heat-shock proteins molecularchaperones and the stress response: evolutionary and ecologicalphysiology.
Some like it hot: the structure and function of small heat-shock proteins.
Although heat-shock proteins act as protective chaperones," Dr.
Classes of drugs examined include SERMs and SERDs, aromatase inhibitors, microtubule binding agents, HER family inhibitors, angiogenesis inhibitors, miotic inhibitors, vaccines and immunomodulators, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and inhibitors of heat-shock proteins 90 and 27.
Microbial cells in which heat-shock proteins are synthesized acquire additional tolerance to a second heat challenge that would normally be lethal to them.
The bacterial heat-shock response is not limited to changes in temperature and is a general stress response, as many of the heat-shock proteins are induced by interaction with eukaryotic hosts (Van bogelen et al.
When that happens, heat-shock proteins can keep a cell healthy by either fixing or expelling damaged cellular components.