heave to

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heave

 (hēv)
v. heaved, heav·ing, heaves
v.tr.
1. To raise or lift, especially with great effort or force: heaved the box of books onto the table. See Synonyms at lift.
2.
a. To throw (a heavy object) with great effort; hurl: heave the shot; heaved a brick through the window.
b. To throw or toss: heaved his backpack into the corner.
3. To give out or utter with effort or pain: heaved a sigh; heaved a groan.
4. To vomit (something).
5. past tense and past participle hove (hōv) Nautical
a. To raise or haul up by means of a rope, line, or cable: hove the anchor up and set sail.
b. To move (a ship) in a certain direction or into a certain position by hauling: hove the ship astern.
6. To make rise or swell: the wind heaving huge waves; an exhausted dog heaving its chest.
7. Geology To displace or move (a vein, lode, or stratum, for example).
v.intr.
1. To rise up or swell, as if pushed up; bulge: The sidewalk froze and heaved.
2. To rise and fall in turn, as waves.
3. To gag or vomit.
4. To pant; gasp: heave for air.
5. past tense and past participle hove Nautical
a. To move in a certain direction or to a specified position: The frigate hove alongside.
b. To pull at or haul a rope or cable: The brig is heaving around on the anchor.
c. To push at a capstan bar or lever.
n.
1. The act or effort of raising or lifting something: with a great heave hauled the fish onto the deck.
2. An act of hurling; a throw, especially when considered in terms of distance: a heave of 63 feet.
3. Geology
a. A horizontal dislocation, as of a rock stratum, at a fault.
b. An upward movement of a surface, especially when caused by swelling and expansion of clay, removal of overburden, or freezing of subsurface water.
4. An upward movement, especially of a ship or aircraft.
5. The act or an instance of gagging or vomiting.
6. heaves(used with a sing. or pl. verb) See recurrent airway obstruction.
Phrasal Verb:
heave to Nautical
1. To turn a sailing ship so that its bow heads into the wind and the ship lies motionless except for drifting, as to meet a storm: The brig hove to.
2. To turn an engine-powered vessel in a similar situation so that its bow heads into the seas while proceeding at low speed.
Idiom:
heave into sight/view
To rise or seem to rise over the horizon into view, as a ship.

[Middle English heven, from Old English hebban; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

heav′er n.

heave to

vb
(Nautical Terms) (adverb) to stop (a vessel) or (of a vessel) to stop, as by trimming the sails, etc. Also: lay to
Translations
تتوقَّف السَّفينَه وسْط البَحْر
zastavit se
lægge bi
stöîva skip

w>heave to

(Naut)
vibeidrehen
vt sep shipstoppen

heave

(hiːv) verb
1. to (try to) lift or to pull, with great effort. They heaved with all their strength, but could not move the rock; They heaved the wardrobe up into the lorry.
2. to throw (something heavy). Someone heaved a stone through my window.
3. to rise, or rise and fall again several times. The earthquake made the ground heave.
noun
the act of heaving. He gave one heave and the rock moved; the heave of the waves.
heave a sigh
to sigh. He heaved a sigh of relief when he reached safety.
heave to (houv) past tense, past participle hove
– (of a ship) to (cause to) stop while at sea. The ship hove to.
References in periodicals archive ?
This project is to reconstruct Rabbit Street to reduce severe heaving to the road surface.