heavyweight

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heav·y·weight

 (hĕv′ē-wāt′)
n.
1. One of above average weight.
2.
a. The heaviest weight division in professional boxing, having no upper limit, with contestants usually weighing more than 200 pounds (90.7 kilograms).
b. A boxer competing in this weight division.
c. A similar weight division in other sports, such as weightlifting.
d. A contestant in this weight division.
3. Informal A person of great importance or influence.

heav′y·weight′ adj.

heavyweight

(ˈhɛvɪˌweɪt)
n
1. a person or thing that is heavier than average
2. (Boxing)
a. a professional boxer weighing more than 175 pounds (79 kg)
b. an amateur boxer weighing more than 81 kg (179 pounds)
c. (as modifier): the world heavyweight championship.
3. (Wrestling) a wrestler in a similar weight category (usually over 214 pounds (97 kg))
4. informal an important or highly influential person

heav•y•weight

(ˈhɛv iˌweɪt)

adj.
1. heavy in weight.
2. of more than average weight or thickness: a coat of heavyweight material.
3. of or pertaining to heavyweights: a heavyweight bout.
4. very powerful, influential, or important: a team of heavyweight lawyers.
n.
5. a person of more than average weight.
6. a boxer or weightlifter of the heaviest competitive class, esp. a professional boxer weighing more than 175 lb. (79.4 kg).
7. one that is very powerful or influential.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heavyweight - an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 201 poundsheavyweight - an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 201 pounds
boxer, pugilist - someone who fights with his fists for sport
2.heavyweight - a wrestler who weighs more than 214 pounds
grappler, matman, wrestler - combatant who tries to throw opponent to the ground
3.heavyweight - a professional boxer who weighs more than 190 pounds
prizefighter, gladiator - a professional boxer
4.heavyweight - a very large personheavyweight - a very large person; impressive in size or qualities
large person - a person of greater than average size
5.heavyweight - a person of exceptional importance and reputationheavyweight - a person of exceptional importance and reputation
important person, influential person, personage - a person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events

heavyweight

noun
Informal. An important, influential person:
adjective
1. Having a relatively great weight:
2. Informal. Being among the leaders in one's field:
Informal: big-league, bigtime.
Translations
وَزن ثَقيل
v těžké váze
sværvægter
nehézsúlyú
òungaviktar-
ťažká váhav ťažkej váhe
ağır siklet

heavyweight

[ˈhevɪweɪt]
A. ADJpesado, de mucho peso
B. N (Boxing, fig) → peso m pesado

heavyweight

[ˈhɛviweɪt]
n
(BOXING)poids m lourd
(= important person) → grosse pointure f
modif (BOXING) [champion, boxing title] → poids lourd

heavyweight

n
(Sport) → Schwergewicht nt, → Schwergewichtler(in) m(f)
(fig inf: = influential person) → großes Tier (inf); the literary heavyweightsdie literarischen Größen pl
adj
(Sport) heavyweight championMeister(in) m(f)im Schwergewicht; heavyweight boxer(Boxer(in) m(f)im) Schwergewicht nt, → Schwergewichtler(in) m(f); heavyweight classSchwergewicht nt
(fig inf: = serious) issue, subjectgewichtig; writer, commentator, interviewerernst zu nehmend; positionbedeutend; newspaperseriös
(= thick, heavy) cloth, plastic, paperschwer

heavyweight

[ˈhɛvɪˌweɪt]
1. n (Boxing) → (peso) massimo (fig) (important or influential person) → autorità f inv, pezzo m grosso
2. adj (issue, subject) → importante

heavy

(ˈhevi) adjective
1. having great weight; difficult to lift or carry. a heavy parcel.
2. having a particular weight. I wonder how heavy our little baby is.
3. of very great amount, force etc. heavy rain; a heavy blow; The ship capsized in the heavy seas; heavy taxes.
4. doing something to a great extent. He's a heavy smoker/drinker.
5. dark and dull; looking or feeling stormy. a heavy sky/atmosphere.
6. difficult to read, do, understand etc. Books on philosophy are too heavy for me.
7. (of food) hard to digest. rather heavy pastry.
8. noisy and clumsy. heavy footsteps.
ˈheavily adverb
ˈheaviness noun
ˌheavy-ˈduty adjective
made to stand up to very hard wear or use. heavy-duty tyres.
heavy industry
industries such as coalmining, ship-building etc which involve the use of large or heavy machines or which produce large or heavy products.
ˈheavyweight adjective, noun
(a person) in the heaviest of the various classes into which competitors in certain sports (eg boxing, wrestling) are divided according to their weight. a heavyweight boxer.
heavy going
difficult to make any progress with. I found this book very heavy going.
a heavy heart
a feeling of sadness. He obeyed with a heavy heart.
make heavy weather of
to find surprising difficulty in doing. He said he'd finish the job in half an hour, but he's making rather heavy weather of it.
References in classic literature ?
No, I'm sure your pretty arms were never meant for such heavy weights.
He stripped himself of his upper clothing, and set to work, with the heavy weights in each hand, waving them up and down, and backward and forward, in every attainable variety o f movement, till his magnificent muscles seemed on the point of starting through his sleek skin.
Boxes and bales were rising out of the hold and being carried into the warehouse by stout porters, who tugged and bawled and clattered about with small trucks, or worked cranes with iron claws that came down and clutched heavy weights, whisking them aloft to where wide doors like mouths swallowed them up.
He moved with the graceful ease of a jungle cat and when he lifted heavy weights, the action seemed as effortless as the raising of empty hands.
Stelling's, and the busy idleness of castle-building in a "last half" at school, to the companionship of sacks and hides, and bawling men thundering down heavy weights at his elbow.
They belong to the caste whose men do not count, and they walked with squared elbows, swinging hips, and heads on high, as suits women who carry heavy weights.
Carty was taken by his father to the shop where the bells were made, and he was profoundly impressed by the magical strength of a big magnet, that picked up heavy weights as though they were feathers.
Although drawn downwards by the heavy weight which hastened his rapid descent, it seemed to him as if the fall lasted for a century.
The king looked puzzled -- he wasn't a very heavy weight, intellectually.
Occasionally, they sink a cord in the river by a heavy weight, with a buoy at the upper end, to keep floating.
But a heavy weight has fallen on my spirits, my good friend, and the sadness that gathers over me, will yield to neither hope nor reason.
Jo read it thankfully, but the heavy weight did not seem lifted off her heart, and her face was so full of misery that Laurie asked quickly, "What is it?