Hebraism


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He·bra·ism

 (hē′brā-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A manner or custom characteristic of the Hebrews.
2. A linguistic feature typical of Hebrew occurring especially in another language.
3. The culture, spirit, or character of the Hebrew people.
4. Judaism.

Hebraism

(ˈhiːbreɪˌɪzəm)
n
1. (Languages) a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature borrowed from or particular to the Hebrew language, or to the Jewish people or their culture
2. (Peoples) a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature borrowed from or particular to the Hebrew language, or to the Jewish people or their culture

He•bra•ism

(ˈhi breɪˌɪz əm, -bri-)

n.
1. an expression or construction distinctive of the Hebrew language.
2. the character, spirit, principles, or practices of the Hebrews.
[1560–70; < Late Greek]

Hebraism, Hebraicism

1. an expression or construction peculiar to Hebrew.
2. the character, spirit, principles, or customs of the Hebrew people.
3. a Hebrew loanword in English, as shekel. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraic, adj.
See also: Language
the thought, spirit, and practice characteristic of the Hebrews. — Hebraist, n. — Hebraistic, Hebraistical, adj.
See also: Judaism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hebraism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the TalmudHebraism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Jewish Orthodoxy, Orthodox Judaism - Jews who strictly observe the Mosaic law as interpreted in the Talmud
Conservative Judaism - Jews who keep some of the requirements of the Mosaic law but allow for adaptation of other requirements (as some of the dietary laws) to fit modern circumstances
Reform Judaism - the most liberal Jews; Jews who do not follow the Talmud strictly but try to adapt all of the historical forms of Judaism to the modern world
Jewry - Jews collectively
References in periodicals archive ?
Hebraism is rare in Judeo-Tat and is limited to religious vocabulary, but even here is not exclusive, so we find the Arabic-Persian phrase ja[?
At the same time, monolingual Hebraism is largely a thing of the past except in some radical religious Zionist enclaves.
Her interests in scholarship include Christian Hebraism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English literature, cognitive poetics, and feminist biography.
Reading the Rabbis: Christian Hebraism in the Works of Herbert of Bosham
Its origins lay in earlier times, in the history of American Hebraism and, more specifically, in the history of American readings, interpretations, and applications of the Old Testament.
Indeed, it has been argued that the greatest dichotomy in Western thought exists between Hellenism and Hebraism, between our Classical and biblical traditions.
Milton and the Rabbis: Hebraism, Hellenism, & Christianity.
To move from the ethical to the aesthetic interest of literature is to move, in Arnold's words, from Hebraism to Hellenism.
Matthew Arnold (1822-1888) spoke of Hebraism and Hellenism.
Even so it will be of value to anyone interested in the early modern intellectual world or the long and vexed history of Christian Hebraism and Jewish-Christian intellectual relations generally.
In these works, he offered an account of Hebraism and its relation to Hellenism, the two forces between which moved the modern nations.
A professor of Hebrew and Middle Eastern studies at Emory University, he has published on Hebraism in the United States and related subjects.