Hebrew calendar


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Hebrew calendar

n
(Judaism) another term for the Jewish calendar
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Noun1.Hebrew calendar - (Judaism) the calendar used by the Jews; dates from 3761 BC (the assumed date of the Creation of the world); a lunar year of 354 days is adjusted to the solar year by periodic leap years
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
lunisolar calendar - a calendar based on both lunar and solar cycles
Jewish calendar month - a month in the Jewish calendar
Tishri - the first month of the civil year; the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in September and October)
Heshvan - the second month of the civil year; the eighth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in October and November)
Chislev, Kislev - the third month of the civil year; the ninth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in November and December)
Tebet, Tevet - the fourth month of the civil year; the tenth month of the ecclesiastical year (in December and January)
Shebat, Shevat - the fifth month of the civil year: the eleventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in January and February)
Adar - the sixth month of the civil year; the twelfth month of the ecclesiastic year in the Jewish calendar (in February and March)
Adar Sheni, Veadar - included seven times in every 19 years
Nisan, Nissan - the seventh month of the civil year; the first month of the ecclesiastic year (in March and April)
Iyar, Iyyar - the eighth month of the civil year; the second month of the ecclesiastical year (in April and May)
Sivan, Siwan - the ninth month of the civil year; the third month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in May and June)
Tammuz, Thammuz - the tenth month of the civil year; the fourth month of the ecclesiastic year (in June and July)
Av, Ab - the eleventh month of the civil year; the fifth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in July and August)
Ellul, Elul - the twelfth month of the civil year; the sixth month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar (in August and September)
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2005, the racial identity was removed from the card - though the space is still there marked by asterisks - but there are other ways to distinguish who is Jewish and who is non-Jewish on the card, including the use of the Hebrew calendar for the birthdate of Jews and Gregorian calendar for non-Jews.
Hanukkah, which means "dedication" or "inauguration," begins on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar and usually occurs in November or December.
The Hebrew calendar is often described as "lunisolar" because the length of the calendar month is approximately equal to the lunar (or synodic) month of about 29.
Al-Quds said Israel has imposed a closure on the West Bank and Gaza Strip starting midnight last night through Tuesday while it celebrates its creation according to the Hebrew calendar.
There is still something almost otherworldly about the beautifully set table, the decorations personalized family by family, the ritual of serving and eating outside as we pray for clear skies and of course the seasonal swingswarmer or colder depending on how the Hebrew calendar syncs with the secular one.
PNG, PDF, Hijri/Lunar, Hebrew Calendar Date Field option supported, The Analogue of NEXT Field is Added to LINQ Reporting Engine, Performance Optimization of UpdateFields and ExecuteWithRegions, added HtmlLoadOptions.
Hanukkah is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar.
Thousands of people, mostly Jewish youths, took part Sunday in the annual Flag Dance ("Rikudegalim") parade marking Jerusalem Day -- the Hebrew calendar date on which Jerusalem was liberated by the Israel Defense Forces, 48 years ago.
It is conducted on the evening of the 15th day of Nisan in the Hebrew calendar throughout the world.
The texts are the anonymous Liber erarum, Robert of Leicester's Treatise on the Hebrew Calendar (1294), Nicholas Trevet's Compotus Hebreorum (1310), the Computus Iudiacus of 1342, and Hermann Zoest's Calendarium Hebraicum Novum (1436).
The Jewish holiday of Chanukah is celebrated for eight days and, as per the Hebrew calendar, starts on the 25th day of Kislev.