Hekla


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Hek·la

 (hĕk′lə)
A volcano, 1,491 m (4,891 ft) high, of southwest Iceland. In medieval Icelandic folklore, Hekla was believed to be one of the gateways to purgatory. It is Iceland's most active volcano, having had more than a dozen major eruptions since the 1100s.

Hekla

(ˈhɛklə)
n
(Placename) a volcano in SW Iceland: several craters, subject to fairly frequent eruptions in recent times. Height: 1491 m (4892 ft)
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At the end of the book, she has achieved what she desires and more: she is the owner of Hotel Hekla.
Hekla, an active volcano, and they will enjoy delicious Icelandic cooking, along with horseback riding (optional) and bathing in geothermal hot tubs.
The Meteorological Office issued warnings to aircraft about the ash which was blasted into the atmosphere by Mount Hekla, near Keflavik in south- west Iceland.
There's also Hekla, the still-erupting volcano, so fierce it earned the medieval tag The Gateway to Hell - it's due to erupt again this year - and the Thingvellir National Park, acres of natural beauty.
Scientists, believing that the Icelandic volcano Hekla is responsible for that acidity peak, have obtained a time of eruption of 950 B.
Hekla volcano to the north, mountains and glaciers towards the east and the Westman Islands to the south.
One of them, Mount Hekla, erupted in March and you can now drive up to see the brand new lava fields - as long as snow hasn't closed the road.
To a great extent, Baillie's response is understandable for seeking to bolster the dendrochronological dates for Santorini and Hekla 3, but we, trained as environmental scientists, refute any accusation of protecting archaeologists from environmental determinism.
Sitting in a hot tub, looking out on Mt Hekla - it last erupted in 2000 and is one of highest volcanoes at 4,892ft saw the weather change from brilliant sunshine to snow to hail to rain and back again.
The relatively minor eruption of Hekla in Iceland in 1970, which produced 200x[10.
The Hekla III volcanic eruption of 1159 BC is suggested as responsible for the drop-off in the use of fulachta fiadh, for the end of the Early Bronze Age, and as the backdrop to the intensification of land-use seen in the dates for upland field systems (Woodman 1992a: 310).
From left, Paul Slater, Richard McGlasham, Dave Stidolph, Hekla Goodman and Paul Wigham <B