held


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held

 (hĕld)
v.
Past tense and past participle of hold1.

held

(hɛld)
vb
the past tense and past participle of hold1

hold1

(hoʊld)

v. held, hold•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to have or keep in the hand; grasp: to hold someone's hand.
2. to set aside; reserve or retain: to hold a reservation.
3. to bear, sustain, or support with or as if with the hands or arms.
4. to keep in a specified state: The preacher held them spellbound.
5. to detain: The police held her for questioning.
6. to conduct; carry on: to hold a meeting.
7. to hinder; restrain: Fear held me from acting.
8. to have the ownership or use of; possess or occupy: to hold a position of authority.
9. to contain or be capable of containing: This bottle holds a quart.
10. to make accountable: We will hold you to your word.
11. to keep in the mind; believe: held certain beliefs.
12. to regard; consider: to hold a person responsible.
13. to keep forcibly: Enemy forces held the hill.
14. to point; aim: He held a gun on the prisoner.
15. to decide legally.
16. to sustain (a musical note, chord, or rest).
17. to omit, as from an order: One burger - hold the pickle.
v.i.
18. to remain in a specified state: Hold still.
19. to maintain a grasp; remain fast: The clamp held.
20. to maintain one's position against opposition.
21. to agree; sympathize: She doesn't hold with new ideas.
22. to remain faithful: to hold to one's purpose.
23. to remain valid: The rule still holds.
24. to refrain; forbear (usu. used imperatively).
25. hold back,
a. to restrain; check: to hold back tears.
b. to hinder the advancement of.
c. to refrain from giving or revealing; withhold: to hold back information.
d. to refrain from participating.
26. hold down,
a. to keep under control or at a low level: to hold down interest rates.
b. to continue to function in: to hold down a job.
27. hold forth, to speak at great length.
28. hold oneself in, to exercise restraint.
29. hold off,
a. to keep at a distance; repel.
b. to postpone action; defer.
30. hold on,
a. to keep a firm grip on something.
b. to keep going; continue.
c. to stop; halt (usu. used imperatively).
d. to keep a telephone connection open.
31. hold out,
a. to present; offer.
b. to continue to last.
c. to refuse to yield.
d. to withhold something expected or due.
32. hold over,
a. to keep for future consideration or action.
b. to keep beyond the arranged period: to hold a movie over for an extra week.
33. hold up,
a. to support; uphold.
b. to delay; bring to a stop.
c. to endure; persevere: I'm tired but holding up.
d. to present for attention; display.
e. to rob at gunpoint.
n.
34. an act of holding fast with the hand or other physical means; grasp; grip: a good hold on the rope.
35. something to hold a thing by; something to grasp, esp. for support.
36. something that holds fast or supports something else.
37. an order reserving something: to put a hold on a library book.
38. a controlling force or dominating influence: to have a hold on a person.
39. a wrestler's maneuver for seizing and controlling an opponent.
40. a pause or delay.
41. a prison cell.
43. a feature on a telephone that allows voice communication to be interrupted without breaking the connection.
Idioms:
1. get hold of,
a. to grasp; seize.
b. to communicate with by telephone.
2. on hold,
a. into a state of interruption or suspension.
b. into a state of being kept waiting incommunicado by a telephone hold.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English h(e)aldan, c. Old Frisian, Old Norse halda, Old High German haltan]
syn: See contain.

hold2

(hoʊld)

n.
1. the cargo space in the hull of a vessel, esp. between the lowermost deck and the bottom.
2. the cargo compartment of an aircraft.
[1585–95; variant of hole; compare Dutch hol hole, hold]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.held - occupied or in the control of; often used in combination; "enemy-held territory"
Translations

held

pret & pp de hold
References in classic literature ?
Meantime the stranger, who had been walking so slowly that all this talk was held before he came opposite the place where they were, neither quickened his pace nor seemed to see that such a man as Robin Hood was in the world.
These they burned upon the split logs of firewood, but they spitted the inward meats, and held them in the flames to cook.
It has been thus, indeed, for four generations, since he who held Groan-Maker has always been unconquerable.
Into the right hand, which was lying palm downwards, a wax taper had been thrust between forefinger and thumb, and an old servant, bending over from behind the chair, held it in position.
So Tip raised him to his feet, and the Pumpkinhead went to the horse and held its head while the boy bored two holes in it with his knife-blade and inserted the ears.
On this accursed bed Don Quixote stretched himself, and the hostess and her daughter soon covered him with plasters from top to toe, while Maritornes- for that was the name of the Asturian- held the light for them, and while plastering him, the hostess, observing how full of wheals Don Quixote was in some places, remarked that this had more the look of blows than of a fall.
The thing, which more nearly resembled our earthly men than it did the Martians I had seen, held me pinioned to the ground with one huge foot, while it jabbered and gesticulated at some answering creature behind me.
687-712) Then Zeus no longer held back his might; but straight his heart was filled with fury and he showed forth all his strength.
I earnestly expressed my hope that he wouldn't, and held tighter to the tombstone on which he had put me; partly, to keep myself upon it; partly, to keep myself from crying.
A high mast was fixed on the frame, held firmly by metallic lashings, to which was attached a large brigantine sail.
I will speak of Louis[*] (and not of Charles[+]) as the one whose conduct is the better to be observed, he having held possession of Italy for the longest period; and you will see that he has done the opposite to those things which ought to be done to retain a state composed of divers elements.
Again Ponta struggled to get free, Joe held on, and the referee thrust them apart.