Hellene

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Related to Hellenes: agora, Troy, Greeks, Greek people

Hel·lene

 (hĕl′ēn′) also Hel·le·ni·an (hĕ-lē′nē-ən)
n.
A Greek.

[Greek Hellēn.]

Hellene

(ˈhɛliːn) or

Hellenian

n
(Peoples) another name for a Greek

Greek

(grik)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Greece, the Greeks, or their language.
2. pertaining to the Greek Orthodox Church.
n.
3. a native or inhabitant of Greece.
4. the Indo-European language of the Greeks. Abbr.: Gk
5. Informal. anything unintelligible, as speech, writing, etc.: This contract is Greek to me.
6. a member of the Greek Orthodox Church.
7. a person who belongs to a Greek-letter fraternity or sorority.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English Grēcas (pl.) < Latin Graecī the Greeks (nominative pl. of Graecus) < Greek Graikoí, pl. of Graikós Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hellene - a native or inhabitant of Greece
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Achaean, Achaian - a member of one of four linguistic divisions of the prehistoric Greeks
Aeolian, Eolian - a member of one of four linguistic divisions of the prehistoric Greeks
Dorian - a member of one of four linguistic divisions of the prehistoric Greeks
Ionian - a member of one of four linguistic divisions of the prehistoric Greeks
Athenian - a resident of Athens
Corinthian - a resident of Corinth
Laconian - a resident of Laconia
Lesbian - a resident of Lesbos
Spartan - a resident of Sparta
Arcadian - an inhabitant of Arcadia
Theban - a Greek inhabitant of ancient Thebes
Argive - a native or inhabitant of the city of Argos
Ephesian - a resident of the ancient Greek city of Ephesus
Mycenaen - a native or inhabitant of ancient Mycenae
Thessalian - a native or inhabitant of Thessaly
Thessalonian - a native or inhabitant of Thessalonica
Translations

Hellene

[ˈheliːn] Nheleno/a m/f
References in classic literature ?
SOCRATES: O Meno, there was a time when the Thessalians were famous among the other Hellenes only for their riches and their riding; but now, if I am not mistaken, they are equally famous for their wisdom, especially at Larisa, which is the native city of your friend Aristippus.
He was a little man, and his breastplate was made of linen, but in use of the spear he excelled all the Hellenes and the Achaeans.
Those again who held Pelasgic Argos, Alos, Alope, and Trachis; and those of Phthia and Hellas the land of fair women, who were called Myrmidons, Hellenes, and Achaeans; these had fifty ships, over which Achilles was in command.
A single State which is her equal you will hardly find, either among Hellenes or barbarians, though many that appear to be as great and many times greater.
And it does not blow through the tender maiden who stays indoors with her dear mother, unlearned as yet in the works of golden Aphrodite, and who washes her soft body and anoints herself with oil and lies down in an inner room within the house, on a winter's day when the Boneless One (22) gnaws his foot in his fireless house and wretched home; for the sun shows him no pastures to make for, but goes to and fro over the land and city of dusky men (23), and shines more sluggishly upon the whole race of the Hellenes.
Quick referred to the upcoming bill on the World Council of Hellenes Abroad, again stressing that, by law, it will be self-regulated and self-funded.
Hence, the American author's attempt to convey his own powerful political message while utilizing references originating from Hellenic literature renders obvious that the Hellenes indeed had a major effect on his storytelling.
In 1939 these ambitious Hellenes were able to organize and take a leap of faith with the purchase of land on Pacific Ave, just south of PCH in Long Beach.
Malgre l'absence de joueurs de renom, les Hellenes, grace a une defense de fer
An ardent hater of Persia surely was he, who, when his own country was at war with Hellenes, did not neglect the common good of Hellas.
It attempts to understand why Greek antiquity could matter so much to the dotti bizantini of Italy that they were prepared to abandon their ancient claims to Roman heritage in order to become, far removed from Greece, representations of the ancient Hellenes.
Kougialis expressed the government`s joy for the visit, adding that the Archbishop plays an important role as regards the Cyprus problem and issues related to the Hellenes.