Hemingwayesque


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Hemingwayesque

(ˌhɛmɪŋˌweɪˈɛsk)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of, relating to, or like Ernest Hemingway or his literary style
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Adj.1.Hemingwayesque - in the manner of Ernest Hemingway
References in periodicals archive ?
It feeds the persistent Hemingwayesque myth of what James Campbell has called "combat Gnosticism," as "a construction that gives us war experience as a kind of gnosis, a secret knowledge which only an initiated elite knows" (1999, 204).
Sigal himself is a colorful, Hemingwayesque journalist.
Gouffignat's irreverence and gleeful sense of irony is an instantly likeable form of Hemingwayesque grace under pressure.
To begin with the Hemingwayesque Code is in itself rather complicated (in view of much of the later research and criticism of his work between the 1960s and 1990s) so only a basic outline is given here which is relevant to our discussion.
137) is a matter-of-fact, Hemingwayesque account of an instance of coldly administered cruelty to a child, with some fine moments of dialogue in Chatsworth dialect.
My brother never acquired one for hunting, either; he lacked the Faulknerian or Hemingwayesque appetite for it.
The rest of the scene is stolen by Stoll, who speaks in Hemingwayesque prose (naturally) and whose cadence dictates his macho body language.
He analyzes in detail Vonnegut's antagonisms toward Hemingway (though Vonnegut is viewed by some as "the most recognizably Hemingwayesque of the new generation of writers to emerge after World War II").
The poem entitled "2495 Redding Road" deploys a Hemingwayesque "iceberg" (since the general reader is not likely to recognize the title as the Connecticut street address of the exiled southerner Robert Penn Warren), and evokes the "place of sturdy grace" that Warren and his family made, all too quickly razed.
There is no stirring contest between bull and matador, no highly ritualized artistry as in Spanish bullfights, no sequined outfits, no Hemingwayesque turn of phrase about death in the afternoon.
If what makes Marcel's madeleine moment so quintessentially Proustian is its lavish exploration of involuntary memory triggered by the little cake, then what makes Nick's apricot juice moment so quintessentially Hemingwayesque is its language of omission, the iceberg theory manifest.
For example, Kima Greggs (Sonja Sohn) resists Bunk's invitation to bend the rules in order to identify one of her assailants with the Hemingwayesque remark, 'Sometimes things just got to play hard' ('Sentencing,' 1: 13).