Henryson


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Henryson

(ˈhɛnrɪsən)
n
(Biography) Robert. ?1430–?1506, Scottish poet. His works include Testament of Cresseid (1593), a sequel to Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida, the 13 Moral Fables of Esope the Phrygian, and the pastoral dialogue Robene and Makyne
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This impressive record is unequalled by any other Older Scots poet and certainly not by Robert Henryson, William Dunbar or Gavin Douglas, to name the makaris most esteemed today.
1) The poem centres on Troilus, his death and ascent to the eighth sphere, but Criseyde, according to some critics, "lacks an apocalyptic ending"--an ending that she would be assigned by Robert Henryson in his famous Testament of Cresseid (Higl 2010: 175).
Katarina Henryson has been performing a capella for more than thirty years.
Social commentary finds its most celebrated expression in Piers Plowman, but is also there in proverbial lore and the fables of Henryson, for example, and it can also be traced indirectly in 'folklaw', promises, oaths, and the like, and in social memory--in so far as these things can be traced from the surviving, written evidence.
The Story of Troilus as Told by Benoit de Sainte- Maure, Giovanni Boccaccio, Geoffrey Chaucer, Robert Henryson.
But, more specifically, when reinterpreting fables sourced in the elegiac Romulus that included internal morals, Henryson directly contradicts the lessons taught in the marked lines of the earlier collection with his own moral lessons.
It places the trumpeter with violinists Nils Okland and Gjermund Larsen (both, crucially, play the earthier sounding Hardanger fiddle in addition to regular violin), cellist Svante Henryson and double bassist Mats Eilertsen.
Cellist Svante Henryson who is equally comfortable playing Bach or improvising--uses his fingers to play pizzicato, more reminiscent of a double bass sound, in addition to long sustains with his bow.
The topics include a historical study of voice onset time in received pronunciation, the origin and function of the grapheme combination qu in English, words denoting kingdom in Layamon's Brut, female animals in fables by Robert Henryson and Biernat of Lublin, a synopsis of the main approaches to semantic change in linguistics through the 19th and 20th centuries, and the linguistic situation in Kenya according to Labov's social factors.
To this, Henryson continues "And more coming every day.
Other essays in the collection include "Wit, Laughter, and Authority in Walter Map's De nugis curialium (Courtiers' Trifles)" by Sebastian Coxon, "The Censorship Trope in Geoffrey Chaucer's Manciple's Tale as Ovidian Metaphor in a Gowerian and Richardian Context" by Anita Obermeier, "Vernacular Auctoritas in Late Medieval England: Writing After the Constitutions" by Kirsty Campbell, "Master Henryson and Father Aesop" by Iain MacLeod Higgins, and "Erasmus's Lucubationes: Genesis of a Literary Oeuvre" by Mark Vessey.
17) Yet it seems that the ballat was equally dependent on words: the poets Dunbar and Henryson both refer to some of their works as ballats, especially those with a narrative focus.