Hepplewhite style


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Hepplewhite style

Furniture produced to or similar to the designs of the London shop-owner George Hepplewhite (active c. 1760–86), whose posthumous Cabinet-maker and Upholster’s Guide (1788; revised editions 1789, 1794) contained almost 300 unsigned examples. Ten in a catalog of the same year are his only signed work. Hepplewhite reinterpreted Adam’s neoclassical style into a simpler, gentler-curved elegance. Serpentine and bow fronts, the shield-back chair, window seats, and Prince of Wales feathers are all characteristic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Crafted in the Hepplewhite style that was popular in this country during the Federal period, all pieces were done in solid mahogany.
The many "modern" satinwoods have a hard act to follow with West Indian satinwood considered a legend for its interpretations of the Sheraton and Hepplewhite styles of furniture.