Heraclitus

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Related to Heraklit: Heraclitean, Heracleitus

Her·a·cli·tus

 (hĕr′ə-klī′təs) fl. 500 bc.
Early Greek philosopher who maintained that strife and change are the natural conditions of the universe.

Her′a·cli′te·an (-tē-ən) adj.

Heraclitus

(ˌhɛrəˈklaɪtəs)
n
(Biography) ?535–?475 bc, Greek philosopher, who held that fire is the primordial substance of the universe and that all things are in perpetual flux

Her•a•cli•tus

(ˌhɛr əˈklaɪ təs)

n.
( “the Obscure” ) c540–c470 B.C., Greek philosopher.
Her`a•cli′te•an (-ti ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Heraclitus - a presocratic Greek philosopher who said that fire is the origin of all things and that permanence is an illusion as all things are in perpetual flux (circa 500 BC)Heraclitus - a presocratic Greek philosopher who said that fire is the origin of all things and that permanence is an illusion as all things are in perpetual flux (circa 500 BC)
Translations
Eraclito

Heraclitus

[ˌherəˈklaɪtəs] NHeráclito

Heraclitus

nHeraklit m
References in periodicals archive ?
Diels, Fragmente der Vorsokratiker (Priessokratiku fragmentai), Heraklit Fr.
Heidegger, Martin, Heraklit, Frankfurt am Main, Vittorio Klostermann, 1979.
Nietzsche, as numerous contemporary philosophers, also tried to relativize the importance of Darwin's discovery by putting him in line with previous philosophers of becoming such as Heraklit and Hegel.
Der Logosbegriff bei Heraklit und Parmenides", en: Phronesis, XXII (1967), pp.
As the discussions between the Parmenides and Heraklit schools, anything in the world can be perceived either as state (entity) or in flow (process), and it was noted in the beginning and by the Buddhist philosophy, that the world can also be perceived as a system of relations, thus showing that non-entity oriented systems of ontology are entirely feasible, and whole civilizations have been built on these foundations.
Gigon, Untersuchungen zu Heraklit (Leipzig 1935) 52-55.
Solch ein Ziel hatten die Gesinnungsmilitaristen um 1900 plausiblerweise nicht im Sinn, weshalb sie auch den Satz von Heraklit aus dem Gesamtzusammenhang rissen und ihn sich ihrem Interesse durchaus i.